Blog posts in Music for March 2011:

Music: Offering (Merzbow)

The press notes for Offering claim the album was inspired by the writings of Juran Hisao, a Japanese author not yet translated into English—in particular his mystery/noir novel Golden Wolf (the text of which is available through the public-domain archive Aozora Bunko)....

By Serdar Yegulalp on 2011/03/11 23:57
Buy at Amazon

The press notes for Offering claim the album was inspired by the writings of Juran Hisao, a Japanese author not yet translated into English—in particular his mystery/noir novel Golden Wolf (the text of which is available through the public-domain archive Aozora Bunko). As with other Merzbow albums where the influences are worn openly on Masami Akita’s sleeve—A Taste Of... was allegedly inspired by various types of sushi—it’s something of a toss-up to see whether or not one can establish a connection between the music and the source material. I wasn’t able to figure out how this Amlux-like collection of rhythm loops and shearing layers of sound hooks back into Hisao’s tale, and I doubt it has anything to do with my translation skills not being quite up to snuff. The two tracks are titled “Deep Sea” and “The Light”, and you could sink into each of them as deeply as their real-world counterparts. This only makes me wonder all the more what album would spring from Akita’s encounters with Dogura Magura.

Read more


Tags: Masami Akita Merzbow music noise review


Music: Electronic Sonata For Souls Loved By Nature (1980) (George Russell)

A second take on George Russell’s masterwork, recorded eleven years later with a different lineup (Victor Comer, Keith Copeland, Jean-Francois Jenny-Clark, Robert Moore, Lew Soloff) and a markedly dissimilar orchestration. This version switches the piano for organ, slows down the...

By Serdar Yegulalp on 2011/03/11 23:32
Buy at Amazon

A second take on George Russell’s masterwork, recorded eleven years later with a different lineup (Victor Comer, Keith Copeland, Jean-Francois Jenny-Clark, Robert Moore, Lew Soloff) and a markedly dissimilar orchestration. This version switches the piano for organ, slows down the tempo of the opening movement to a funky amble, and makes many other changes. Many passages have the same electric thrill as the 1969 performance, although the brass sounds a touch sloppy and flatulent (particularly in the first movements). I still prefer the original, but this one—and the Essence of George Russell version—are fascinating to compare, both in terms of details and the overall sweep and execution of the piece.

Read more


Tags: George Russell jazz music review


Genji Press

Science fiction, rebooted.

Find recent content on the main index or look in the archives to find all content.

About Me

I'm an independent SF and fantasy author, technology journalist, and freelance contemplator for how SF can be made into something more than just a way to blow stuff up.

My Goodreads author profile.

Learn some more about me.

My Books

Out Now

Coming Soon

Previously Released

More about my books

Search This Site

Archives