Blog posts in Movies for April 2010:

Movie Reviews: Samurai Chicks

I didn’t expect a movie named Samurai Chicks to be much good, and I was right. That said, it does have the benefit of being cheap and oddball, which is better than being expensive and boring, I suppose. It does...

By Serdar Yegulalp on 2010/04/30 23:47
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I didn’t expect a movie named Samurai Chicks to be much good, and I was right. That said, it does have the benefit of being cheap and oddball, which is better than being expensive and boring, I suppose. It does not have any samurai in it, strictly speaking, although there are chicks—albeit ones who act more like ninja than samurai. I don’t know if that classifies as false advertising, but just so you know.

What’s genuinely interesting about the movie—or rather, what is more interesting than what happens in the movie—is how it was put together as a political allegory and a statement of identity for its director, Mari Asato. On coming to Tokyo from her native Okinawa, she saw Namie Amuro dancing on the big screen in Shibuya, and shook her head at all the Amuro clones in the vicinity—as if Amuro was sending her a message only she could decipher.

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Tags: Japan movies review


Movie Reviews: Ninja Assassin

Well, at least I can say Ninja Assassin does something I’ve never seen before: It makes ninja boring. It’s to 2009 what The Hunted was to 1995, without the saving graces of Yoko Shimada or Yoshio Harada. When it’s not...

By Serdar Yegulalp on 2010/04/28 18:01
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Well, at least I can say Ninja Assassin does something I’ve never seen before: It makes ninja boring. It’s to 2009 what The Hunted was to 1995, without the saving graces of Yoko Shimada or Yoshio Harada. When it’s not boring it’s annoying, and when it’s not annoying it’s downright incurious—which makes it boring all over again.

The ninja assassin of the title is, I assume, Raizo (Korean pop star Rain), one of a secret network of assassins that has existed for centuries Their master, Ozunu (Eighties martial-arts star Shō Kosugi) recruits orphans into the family, trains them into soulless killers, then hires them out for the fixed cost of 100 pounds of gold per kill. The training is what you’d expect: a brutal master teaching his students in total seclusion, hardships galore, one trial by fire after another (sometimes literally), heartbreak, and finally Raizo striking out on his own. When Europol agent Mika Coretti (Naomie Harris) discovers the network, she becomes their next target. Raizo, the apostate, steps in to protect her from his own former clan brothers, and the digital blood spews.

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Tags: Japan movies ninja review


Movie Reviews: High Kick Girl!

High Kick Girl! is what happens when great martial arts meets mediocre filmmaking. The “High Kick Girl” in question, real-life karate champ Rina Takeda, deserved to have a movie made that featured her talents. I just wish it hadn’t been...

By Serdar Yegulalp on 2010/04/28 00:42
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High Kick Girl! is what happens when great martial arts meets mediocre filmmaking. The “High Kick Girl” in question, real-life karate champ Rina Takeda, deserved to have a movie made that featured her talents. I just wish it hadn’t been this movie, which features even less plot than Ong-Bak, has all the personality of an industrial film, and becomes the one thing a movie like this should never become: Boring as hell.

Takeda plays a teen martial-arts wunderkind named Kei, chafing under the strict tutelage of her master. She has a predilection for finding trouble: in one of the first scenes, she casually strolls into a class full of black belts and takes them all down with her trademark boot to the face. When she’s invited to join a gang of underground martial artists named the Destroyers, with promises of good money, she naively accepts. She doesn’t realize it’s all a trap to help flush her sensei out into the open, and soon it’s her and her master against the Destroyers. One wonders why they didn’t simply, you know, follow her to class to find him, but most people watching this will have nodded off long before they come up with such complaints.

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Tags: Japan martial arts movies review


Movie Reviews: Stormy Night (Arashi no yoru ni)

What a charming movie this is, and at the same time a deep and thoughtful one. Stormy Night adapts a children’s book from Japan into an animated film of remarkable intelligence and keen wit, in much the same way Kiki’s...

By Serdar Yegulalp on 2010/04/26 19:16
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What a charming movie this is, and at the same time a deep and thoughtful one. Stormy Night adapts a children’s book from Japan into an animated film of remarkable intelligence and keen wit, in much the same way Kiki’s Delivery Service was brought to the screen. It’s a perfect example of how a movie can be for all ages without being a “kid’s film”, and for that reason it’s a shame it’s never been released domestically.

The story: Somewhere out in the wilderness, two animals take refuge in a decrepit old barn to sit out a thunderstorm. One is Mei (Hiroki Narimaya), a young goat with a gentle, naïve attitude towards life. The other is the wolf Gav (Shido Nakamura, the voice for Ryuuk in Death Note), a bit of a buffoon, always thinking with his stomach, a bit of a coward. Both are terrified of the storm, and out of fear they talk to each other. In the dark, all they can hear is the other one’s voice, providing reassurance and company. They’re more similar than different: they have the same fears, the same hopes, the same fond nostalgia of one kind or another. They promise to meet again, and use the passphrase “Stormy Night” to recognize each other. Then comes the day of their meeting, in broad daylight, and both of them are flabbergasted. This is the guy I was talking to?

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Tags: Japan anime movies review


Movie Reviews: Battle Heater

How can I not take to heart a film this gleefully bonkers? Battle Heater is about a man-eating radiator, a description which all by itself could well tell you whether or not you want to see it. It’s the sort...

By Serdar Yegulalp on 2010/04/25 01:10
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How can I not take to heart a film this gleefully bonkers? Battle Heater is about a man-eating radiator, a description which all by itself could well tell you whether or not you want to see it. It’s the sort of movie where a small budget and limited resources are made up for with loving attention to detail and a sense of humor—the spiritual godfather to current stuff like Machine Girl and Tokyo Gore Police, although it’s far less gratuitously nasty than either of those films. (Yes, for some people, that is a bonus.)

The “heater” in question is actually a kotatsu, a table-shaped space heater outfitted with a cloth to cover one’s legs. It’s a common fixture in Japanese homes, as much a symbol of comfort there as a bowl of chicken soup or a cup of hot chocolate is here. A junk collector and handyman (veteran Akira Emoto, who’s been in many movies reviewed here) stumbles across a kotatsu that seems destined for the scrapheap, and takes it home to repair it. He’s one of those folks who can’t bear to throw anything away, and so his apartment makes Fibber’s closet look downright tidy.

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Tags: Japan movies review


Movie Reviews: Sorcerer (1977)

It’s a little difficult to convey the disappointment that landed like bricks dropped on the heads of many moviegoers after William Friedkin’s Sorcerer appeared in 1977. The director of The French Connection and The Exorcist had spent something like $20...

By Serdar Yegulalp on 2010/04/12 21:20
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It’s a little difficult to convey the disappointment that landed like bricks dropped on the heads of many moviegoers after William Friedkin’s Sorcerer appeared in 1977. The director of The French Connection and The Exorcist had spent something like $20 million and three years on a movie that for its first half an hour didn’t even have any dialogue in English; a film which was (to most of them) a murk of existential dread and grimy Third World naturalism, not cheery escape; and which disappeared from theaters with barely a murmur to make room for Star Wars and Smokey and the Bandit.

Thirty years later, Sorcerer has held up so well the date on the film almost seems wrong. Then again, it was a product of a moment in the studio system when films of remarkable grit and cynicism (Exorcist and Connection among them) were routinely greenlit as a way to provide audiences with things they couldn’t get on TV. Its globe-hopping storyline and middle-of-nowhere terrain make it feel that much more timeless: it could have been set in any of the past forty to fifty years without needing to change many details. And it features easily the most nerve-wracking second half of any film ever made, although the hour that comes before it is no slouch either.

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Tags: Keith Jarrett Roy Scheider Tangerine Dream William Friedkin movies review


Movie Reviews: Tebana Sankichi: Snot Rocket and Super Detective

Snot Rocket and Super Detective. I’m going to just sit here for a moment and say that title out loud a few times. Snot Rocket and Super Detective. No, the original Japanese title probably doesn’t have that lovely alliteration to...

By Serdar Yegulalp on 2010/04/12 01:03
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Snot Rocket and Super Detective. I’m going to just sit here for a moment and say that title out loud a few times. Snot Rocket and Super Detective. No, the original Japanese title probably doesn’t have that lovely alliteration to it, but I am savoring the way the words mash together. Kinda like half-eaten cereal falling out of a baby’s mouth.

Snot Rocket and Super Detective (that’s the last time I type that title, honest) actually provides us with the answer to what I imagine is an oft-asked question: What were Tak Sakaguchi and Yudai Yamaguchi up to before firing bullets at each other head-on in Versus and commandeering UFOs in the live-action Cromartie High School? Among other things, this … thing, which looks like it was filmed with a camera found in a box of cereal and probably cost about as much as a box of cereal. It’s crude (not just technically but aesthetically as well, as if the Snot Rocket in the title wasn’t a tipoff), juvenile, haphazard, random, inexplicable, and often quite funny.

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Tags: Japan Tak Sakaguchi Yudai Yamaguchi comedy movies review


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