All posts for January 2008


Bondage Dept.

I just finished reading Casino Royale, the first of the Bond novels and of course the novel that was adapted into the newest of the Bond films. There's a lot about the book that's dated -- Bond's innate sexism as...

By Serdar Yegulalp on 2008/01/27 21:25

I just finished reading Casino Royale, the first of the Bond novels and of course the novel that was adapted into the newest of the Bond films. There's a lot about the book that's dated -- Bond's innate sexism as a character, for instance, is presented in such a way that it's not always clear if he's the sexist one or Fleming himself is simply (if unwittingly) recording his own feelings about women. What's odd is that the struggle that Bond engages in with SMERSH -- the Russian counterspy bureau that he makes his sworn enemy by the end of the book -- hasn't really dated much at all, and the second half of the film essentially matches the majority of the book in all the significant details.

Another thing that's striking is Le Chiffre, who in the movie is actually a more interesting character. In the book his desperation is more hinted at than anything else; in the movie, he's clearly in way over his head, and we feel it profoundly, especially in the infamous scene where he gives Bond a beating that makes every man in the room run for the exits. I liked the fact that he was not some giant, untouchable figure of evil, but a scared, somewhat banal and corrupt person whose corruption would eventually be his undoing. The movie stays true to that, even if the way it's presented is a lot more jazzed-up (not that I mind!).

Here's hoping the next film -- working title Quantum of Solace -- is a worthy follow-up.

Read more


Tags: books movies


Voluntary Illiteracy? Dept.

A piece in the Times about Amazon's Kindle got behind some of the usual statistics about the fact that "no one reads anymore". It's something of a misinterpretation. Those that do read more than make up for the many who...

By Serdar Yegulalp on 2008/01/26 15:55

A piece in the Times about Amazon's Kindle got behind some of the usual statistics about the fact that "no one reads anymore". It's something of a misinterpretation. Those that do read more than make up for the many who don't -- in other words, while about 30% of people surveyed recently claim not to have read a book in the past year, another 30% have read at least fifteen in the same timeframe. (Note that while books are mentioned, there's no discussion [at least not here] of newspapers, websites, blogs, etc.)

There's a lot of further nuances to this whole discussion that convince me that reading -- not just "books" -- is far from dead as a leisure or self-education activity. The web, for one, has made it easier than ever to get your hands on text (hey, you're reading some right now!), and also acquire books in general -- something Amazon knows from the inside out, which is part of the reason they tend to be one of the first places people go when looking for a book they can't find. And on top of all that, publishing stands to be a $15 billion industry this year, according to the article's references -- hardly a dying market.

Oddly enough, I'm reminded of the video-game market. There are many people who never play video games, never touch them, never bother with them. They're heavily counterbalanced by all the people who not only do all those things, and do them with an enthusiasm that far outstrips expectations.

It is frustrating, though, to encounter people who simply don't read for pleasure or self-enlightenment. One of my pet theories about such people is that a fair chunk of them may simply have undiagnosed or untreated reading disabilities -- e.g., they were taught with a non-phonic / "whole word" reading method which often creates functional illiterates -- and so reading isn't something they want to put themselves through, no matter what the reward. I'm not wholly convinced we live in a "post-literate" culture except in the sense that people think they can get bigger kicks elsewhere, and usually can.

Maybe this is the best way to put it: We live in a culture where nobody reads the people who grouse that nobody reads anymore.

Read more


Tags: books reading writing


Swag Dept.

The 5-disc Blade Runner set on Blu-ray arrived the other afternoon, at the store where I'd ordered it. I'd actually gotten the 4-disc set on DVD from a friend as a belated gift, but I was able to swap it...

By Serdar Yegulalp on 2008/01/26 15:05

The 5-disc Blade Runner set on Blu-ray arrived the other afternoon, at the store where I'd ordered it. I'd actually gotten the 4-disc set on DVD from a friend as a belated gift, but I was able to swap it for the Blu-ray set for only a couple dollars more, and everyone went away happy.

So far I've only watched the first disc -- and just the feature on the first disc, no commentaries or anything like that -- but its status as legend is re-cemented in my mind. The touch-ups they've made, by the way, are so subtle and well-done that you'd never know they were there unless you were hunting for them in the first place.

On the way back I swung through a local bookstore and took a look at what was on the discounted tables. To my surprise, they had marked down the recent snazzy-looking reprints of Ian Fleming's Bond novels, so I grabbed two: Casino Royale and You Only Live Twice. I did remember reading some of the Bond adventures when I was much younger -- like Moonraker, which is so far removed from the film it's not funny -- but my memory of them was pretty hazy, and I had tried to read them at an age where I didn't appreciate most of what was going on.

I also snapped up a bunch of other things that looked interesting and were dirt cheap:

  • Pierre Guyotat, Eden Eden Eden: "Infamous" is the nicest word used to describe this verbal emetic that most people will shelve along with Naked Lunch and the rest of the books of that school of psychic and verbal assault. At $7 I figured it was worth a look, especially since I've seen copies swapping hands for as much as $30.
  • Hwang Sok-Yong, The Guest: "During the Korean War, Hwanghae Province in North Korea was the setting of a gruesome fifty-two day massacre. In an act of collective amnesia the atrocities were attributed to American military, but in truth they resulted from malicious battling between Christian and Communist Koreans. Forty years later, Ryu Yosop, a minister living in America returns to his home village, where his older brother once played a notorious role in the bloodshed. Besieged by vivid memories and visited by the troubled spirits of the deceased, Yosop must face the survivors of the tragedy and lay his brother's soul to rest." [*]
  • Yi Chong-jun, Your Paradise: "...tells the story of a leper colony, where the lepers are outwardly treated with the greatest of kindnesses. Indeed, a new director is attempting the reintegrate the leper community and their families with the world outside the leper island. But suddenly he meets great resistance-not from the world outside, but from the lepers themselves, who prefer the protection and organization of the island. The lepers want nothing to do with modern-day Korea with its numerous problems." -- From the book's back jacket. I've decided to start getting into modern Korean literature, and these two seemed like good places to start.
  • Hagiwara Sakurato, Howling at the Moon: Poetry from an early 20th-century Japanese master of same, newly translated by Hiroaki Sato.
  • 100 Verses from Old Japan: A Tuttle edition of the Hyaku-nin-isshiu, a compendium of classic verses that's been around in one form or another since the 7th century.

There's also a bunch of new comics in for review at AMN (soon to undergo a name change -- more on that later), including the long-awaited Purgatory Kabuki, the Hell Girl manga, and a reprint of Masamune Shirow's Dominion (Tank Police). Look for all that soon.

Read more


Tags: Japan Korea anime books movies


Women In Space Dept.

Deb Aoki, About.com's manga expert, spoke recently with To Terra... and Andromeda Stories creator/co-creator Keiko Takemiya....

By Serdar Yegulalp on 2008/01/25 13:11

Deb Aoki, About.com's manga expert, spoke recently with To Terra... and Andromeda Stories creator/co-creator Keiko Takemiya.

Read more


Tags: Japan links manga


myTunes Dept.

Over the last six months or so I find the list of records that spend the most time in my music player has evolved yet again. Some of this stuff is material I want to review at length, but a...

By Serdar Yegulalp on 2008/01/24 12:10

Over the last six months or so I find the list of records that spend the most time in my music player has evolved yet again. Some of this stuff is material I want to review at length, but a cursory rundown should do:

  • Van Morrison, Astral Weeks: I can scarcely believe the man who recorded this music was in his very early twenties when he entered the studio; as Lester Bangs once said in his famous essay about the album, it sounds like there are lifetimes behind it. There are days when I can't bear to put it on because it's so painful, and days when I can't listen to anything else because it stands like a wall between me and whatever pain is in my life. If that's not a sign of artistic greatness, I'm not sure what is.
  • Klaus Schulze, Irrlicht: The title means "Will O' The Wisp", and it's a fitting name for a record that seems to conjure up, out of nowhere at all, the most frightening energy and presence of menace I've heard in an album since some of the stuff on Miles Davis's Get Up With It (which is about half dross and half seething horror). Most of the album isn't even electronic, per se; it's regular instruments transmuted through studio technique and made to sound otherworldly, in the sense of what another world might sound like if we landed on it.
  • Philip Glass, Symphony #4, "Heroes": The gimmick here is that Glass took David Bowie's album of the same name, or at least major chunks of it, and created a trademark-arpeggiated cover version of it. Well, that's not what he did, and that's the beauty of it: he created a symphony that uses the album as a starting point for his own departures, and didn't simply reiterate what you already heard, but transformed and built on it without ever quite leaving it completely behind.
  • Holy Gang, Free Tyson Free!: A thoroughly despicable piece lyrically (go read about Tyson's career in Richard Rhodes's Why They Kill for a fresh perspective on the man's propensity for violence), but the musical combination of Front 242's Richard 23 and fellow Belgian industrialists La Muerte is bracing at best. It's the kind of record I feel distinctly ashamed for enjoying in a totally mindless way (like Prodigy, when they weren't singing about rohybnol or such drivel).
  • Bryan Ferry, Bête Noire: What I like most about Ferry (and Roxy Music) to boot is that even when they're "slumming it", emotionally, they're not slumming: there's always something in there that feels halfway authentic, even if it's just in the form of Ferry realizing how in-authentic it must all seem when he puts it into a mere song. (Talk about convoluted.) That and as far as this record goes, there's really only one bad song on it -- the rubbery "New Town", and even that one grew on me after a while.
  • Otis Rush, Essential Collection: This is what the Groaning the Blues / Cobra sets were repackaged as, and they serve as the best all-in-one introduction to the bluesman who got treated with such utter disdain by the recording industry that it's a miracle he got anything waxed at all. Then you put the needle down on this stuff and wonder how they could not have recorded him. Play this stuff back-to-back with the first couple of Public Image Limited albums for the starkest musical contrasts imaginable in some of the same emotional territory of dread and disgust and disdain. Survive that and you'll live through anything, I think.

Read more


Tags: music


Biblio-File Dept.

A piece in the Times entitled "Their House to Yours, via the Trash" talks about how book scavengers eke out a living on New York's mean (main?) streets. The target of their hockery: the Strand Bookstore, a Mecca for booklovers...

By Serdar Yegulalp on 2008/01/23 14:57

A piece in the Times entitled "Their House to Yours, via the Trash" talks about how book scavengers eke out a living on New York's mean (main?) streets. The target of their hockery: the Strand Bookstore, a Mecca for booklovers and booksellers alike.

Most of the stuff they sell ends up in the $1 bin outside the shop, but that's actually one of the first places I end up looking on a warm day, and the treasures you can find there are startling. I once blundered across an original copy of Mel Lyman's Mirror at the End of the Road in that bin, although when I found out a bit more about Lyman I felt weird having it around the house and got rid of it.

Read more


Tags: books links


Hero's Winding Path Dept.

In the commentary track for Kinji Fukasaku's film Under the Flag of the Rising Sun (a really outstanding piece of work that I will cover here shortly), there is some discussion of the covenant or pact that exists between rural...

By Serdar Yegulalp on 2008/01/22 01:39

In the commentary track for Kinji Fukasaku's film Under the Flag of the Rising Sun (a really outstanding piece of work that I will cover here shortly), there is some discussion of the covenant or pact that exists between rural Japanese villagers, something that has apparently not changed in centuries. Normally there are ten rules that exist between villagers, but if for whatever reason the village chooses to shun you as an outcast, you will only be protected by two of them: 1) you will be rescued if your house catches fire, and 2) you will be buried when you die. Unfortunately, I don't think the commentary mentioned what the other eight rules were, so I'm probably going to have to dig those up on my own and find out.

Some of this is obviously going back into Tensai Kenki, since one of the cycles of the story involves Asagiri, the fisherwoman with whom the hero becomes closely involved. I'm considering having him spend some time in her village and grow close to their way of life, at first as a survival measure and then later as a kind of -- for some reason the word atonement came to mind. By being with them and by living as he does, Ryu performs a kind of emotional or spiritual ablution, a way of distancing himself from something he's done.

It's odd how my imagination can work. I didn't know what Ryu would be atoning for, specifically, but somehow it seemed right for the emotional arc of the character to include this. Something he has done demands a wholly different kind of behavior from him than anything else he's ever manifested before -- a behavior which at first coalesces into an urge to just run (i.e, run and hide in the fishing village), but which later changes into something else.

I followed that line of thinking, and ended up with what seems to be the first major arc of the story: the drawing-together of the three main characters.

* * *

In his fourteenth year, Ryu -- son of a reasonably well-off samurai -- attends a fencing school and injures one of his fencing partners badly enough that the other boy dies. Ryu is deeply disturbed by this -- not just that he caused someone's death but because now that he he has actually killed (in an "age of peace", no less), he realizes just how exhilarating it truly is to have that much power over the life and death of another. He's still sorting through this morass of emotions when the dead boy's father shows up and begs Ryu's own father for the chance to duel with the young man -- for real -- as a way to clear his family's name. Ryu's father refuses, but Ryu himself insists on doing it -- not because he wants to kill the other man, but because he has at least half a mind to let himself be killed.

The day of the duel arrives, and Ryu's father takes the opportunity to turn it into a bit of brutal theater -- a way to show his own lieges the importance of passing the right values down to one's children, etc. The fight is a ghastly farce: Ryu's wounded (if only superficially), and his father goads him on to finish the job. Only when the boy is backed into a corner does his killer instinct assert itself and finish the job. Overcome with self-loathing, Ryu abandons his home, his title, and his privilege.

Not long after running away, Ryu finds himself in the company of Aki, a thief and con artist who also sells his services as a bodyguard. Ryu doesn't much like siding with him, but does so mostly as a way to protect his own hide, and in return does his best to appeal to whatever nascent morality might be within Aki, and from there goad him towards doing things that are marginally less despicable. It's not that Aki is a wholly bad person; he's just more easily motivated by greed and the promise of good times than most other things -- but Ryu has a keener eye for observing Aki's behavior than either of them realize at first.

Their travels together take them to a seaside fishing village where there's allegedly a whole cache of samurai loot (swords, armor, etc.) stashed in one of the caves further up the coastline. To their amazement they find a girl, Asagiri, living there with the loot as an outcast -- the other villagers treat her as a pariah, and while they don't prevent Aki and Ryu from going to her, they do sternly warn them that no good will come of it. The story Asagiri has for them: a gang of bandits originally owned the loot, bandits who attacked her original home village (much further away), but she collaborated with one of their kind to steal it away from them. He died in the process but she was able to hide here, and if the bandits show up again she'll be ready for them. Ryu finds himself responding to her advances, and after a feverish night together she's calling herself his wife, and he can scarcely see a reason to object.

Unfortunately, Asagiri's story is distorted, to put it mildly. When Aki prepares to leave both of them behind, she cheerfully tells him the whole thing, since she doesn't expect him to tell Ryu anyway. She sold out her home village to the bandits to get revenge on her father, the village magistrate, because he arranged a marriage for her to another village's magistrate (whom she despised). The bandits stormed the place, burned the village, took the women, and the bandit leader made Asagiri his chosen lady -- but then one of the other village women (who had also been chosen as a concubine by the bandit leader) turned out to be at least as good at playing this game as Asagiri herself. Worst of all, one of her fellow villagers survived to take his revenge on the bandits, and she only survived by, again, collaborating with one of the more weak-willed bandits to steal some of their samurai treasure ... and then murdering him once they had got away clean, lest she be forced into becoming his husband.

Aki is aghast at what he hears, but doesn't let on. He decides to stick around at least long enough to take Ryu aside when a moment presents itself and clue the poor kid in. The opportunity never arises, however, as the bandit leader's former lieutenant -- a man even more bloodthirsty than his former commander -- shows up (minus an eye and a finger) with a whole new gang of goons made up of former samurai, now pirates. Ryu and Aki have to dive in and fight to first save their own necks, then Asagiri's, and then the nearby village.

[End of part one]

Read more


Tags: Japan hero writing


Don't Miss This Dept.

The first installment in my ongoing series, What You're Missing, has gone up at AMN: What You're Missing, January 2008: Azumi Each month (sometimes more often, depending on what's at hand), What You're Missing will cover a different property, anime...

By Serdar Yegulalp on 2008/01/20 18:16

The first installment in my ongoing series, What You're Missing, has gone up at AMN:

What You're Missing, January 2008: Azumi

Each month (sometimes more often, depending on what's at hand), What You're Missing will cover a different property, anime or manga, which for whatever reason hasn't yet reached an English-speaking audience in a legit edition but deserves your attention. Said titles usually fit into one of the above three categories--previously licensed but out of print; unlicensed; unlicensable--but for all I know, some of these titles may already have been picked up and are being negotiated for as we speak.

... There are so many genuinely good and undiscovered (or at least under-promoted) releases out there, it's about time I quite lamenting that fact and did what I could to give them the exposure they deserve.

Next month will be a three-volume series by a manga-ka whose work has remained, as far as I can tell, completely unpublished in English-speaking territories.

Read more


Tags: links manga


Look What's Coming Dept.

Never to be outdone, Criterion has once again grabbed up a title I thought I would never see in a legitimate edition: Blast of Silence, a New York City noir of such amazing nihilism that it's no wonder it almost...

By Serdar Yegulalp on 2008/01/20 02:38

Never to be outdone, Criterion has once again grabbed up a title I thought I would never see in a legitimate edition: Blast of Silence, a New York City noir of such amazing nihilism that it's no wonder it almost disappeared without a trace after its release.

The U.S. version of 5 Centimeters Per Second hits shelves on March 4.

Discotek, a favorite "tiny" label of mine, swings back into action with a Teruo Ishii adaptation of a Kazuo Koike (Lone Wolf and Cub) story: Bohachi Bushido: Legend of the Forgotten Eight. Looks like it's loaded with extras, too...

Tokyo Shock has a Sukeban Deka two-fer coming up -- a great way to get both yo-yo-slinging flicks for the price of one.

Sessue Hayakawa's The Dragon Painter is also getting a release; this is something I will definitely want to check out up-close.

Also worth checking out: a little masterpiece named The Quiet Room, in what I believe is its first domestic pressing.

Read more


Tags: Amazon.com Criterion movies


Movie Reviews: Sunshine

Sunshine takes a movie premise that has been done to death and does it so well that it almost feels like this idea has never been tried before. There’s a whole subgenre of movies where an intrepid crack team...

By Serdar Yegulalp on 2008/01/19 21:00
Buy at Amazon

Sunshine takes a movie premise that has been done to death and does it so well that it almost feels like this idea has never been tried before. There’s a whole subgenre of movies where an intrepid crack team of scientists / adventurers / total lunatics embark on a mission to save the world by going all the way the heck out into the unknown, and most of them are pretty terrible: Armageddon and The Core come most recently to mind. Sunshine stands out by being a) not terrible by a long shot, b) grounded in as much physical reality as most Hollywood pictures can stand to get away with, and c) using the adventure premise of the story as a lead-in to something bigger and deeper.

The premise: The sun is dying (why? Eh, don’t ask), and a space mission has been sent out to reignite it with a special bomb. A previous mission was lost without a trace several years ago, which makes this attempt—codenamed “Icarus II”—all the more urgent. So far everything has been going according to schedule, but not long after Icarus II passes the point where it can no longer communicate with Earth, the crew picks up a strange signal—Icarus I’s distress beacon. They’re tempted to investigate, but Captain Kaneda (none other than Hiroyuki Sanada) says no: “Nothing, literally nothing, is more important than this mission.” Shotgun foreshadowing, to be sure, but only in retrospect.

Read more


Tags: movies review


Ketchup Dept.

Not a lot of posting going on due to work and various projects, but I thought I'd drop a few notes. New Golden Age is probably going to get a name-change after all. The tentative new title I have is...

By Serdar Yegulalp on 2008/01/17 12:32

Not a lot of posting going on due to work and various projects, but I thought I'd drop a few notes.

  1. New Golden Age is probably going to get a name-change after all. The tentative new title I have is The Four Day Weekend, which I'm honestly not crazy about either, but I'm still fishing around for other possibilities. I'm just shy of 80,000 words with about 100,000 being the target.
  2. Vajra (possibly retitled The Mapmaker) or an older story named Out of Place may be the follow-up(s) once that's finished.
  3. Tensai Kenki, the "hero story", is still missing a couple of key ingredients. I'm just short of making the whole thing really catch fire and become something truly special, but I won't be able to make that happen automatically. One more piece, a truly memorable and fascinating adversary, is what I need.
  4. I downloaded an implementation of TeX to do typesetting for future book releases, but it's difficult to cleanly import Word into it; I might have to come up with some kind of custom filter to just import the formatting I need, and leave the rest to be done by hand. I tried Scribus but its importing of third-party text is very poor. I'm back to Word all over again for this, much as I hate to admit it, and I can't shell out a few hundred bucks for something like Quark (which I hate anyway).
  5. Some of the DVD archives broke. I'm working on it, but it's slow going.
  6. Look for some interesting new features in AMN before long, courtesy of yours truly.

Other stuff that caught my attention:

  • "The Moral Instinct", courtesy of Steven Pinker, in the New York Times Magazine. Pinker's writings have attracted about equal fascination and ire (he seems a little too enamored of the Chomsky school of innate language for my taste), but it's a good read and spurs some thought.
  • A profile of John Burnham Schwartz's upcoming novel The Commoner, a somewhat fictionalized take on the life of Japanese Empress Michiko. Looks nifty; I may want to snag it when it comes out.

Read more


Tags: Japan books links writing


Genji Press: Projects: Post-Holiday Updates!

I hope everyone's 2007 holidays were terrific, and that you're all looking forward to even better things in 2008. Mine were, and I am! I've posted over at the New Golden Age blog about what's happening with that, my...

By Serdar Yegulalp on 2008/01/10 10:09

I hope everyone's 2007 holidays were terrific, and that you're all looking forward to even better things in 2008. Mine were, and I am!

I've posted over at the New Golden Age blog about what's happening with that, my new and current project after Summerworld. Go check it out if you haven't already.

Also, all the in-stock copies of Summerworld itself are gone, so if you want to order for now, use the main ordering link for Lulu.com. My next step is to set up the book for barcoded distribution in a couple of months, after I do a little bit more tweaking to the layout and internal design. (For one, I'm thinking about ditching the ugly "Glinebooks" logo and coming up with some better branding.)

And at some point in 2008, I'm going to launch some kind of unified website for everything I'm working on -- all the book projects in one handy space, instead of being scattered across a whole series of blogs. For now everything is staying where it is, but expect some fairly major reworking of design before too much longer.

Finally, a big thank you to everyone who bought the book, who enjoyed the book, and who looks forward to everything else I've got coming in the future!

Read more


Close At Hand Dept.

I did some rearranging in the home office, and ended up with an empty shelf immediately to my right at eye level. My first temptation was to fill it with the kinds of things that I like to pull out...

By Serdar Yegulalp on 2008/01/10 01:25

I did some rearranging in the home office, and ended up with an empty shelf immediately to my right at eye level. My first temptation was to fill it with the kinds of things that I like to pull out and read, or just look at, as a kind of mental palate cleanser throughout the day.

The list of books on the shelf is a fair jumble, but one of the big standouts is Coffin: The Art of Vampire Hunter D, courtesy of a good and longtime friend of mine. It's enormous, for one -- a softcover in a hardback sleeve -- and it opens up across the whole desk when I look through it. It's a nice way to remind myself that the moment we're in, here and now, is not the only thing that could exist or has existed.

One of the other books on there is the screenplay / art portfolio that Akira Kurosawa assembled for Ran. It is out of print and not easy to find, and in my utopia there will be a copy of this book to go with a copy of the movie. I think if I had to throw out all but ten books in my collection, this would be one of those ten without me even having to think about it. Kurosawa painted the pictures in the book over several years, when he was already nearly blind, and the fact that you can look at some of the stills in the movie and some of the canvases and see one-to-one matches in nearly every shot is worth more than any number of years of film school.

There's also that out-of-print book of '20s / '30s Japanese boy's magazine illustrations that I found on eBay and snapped pictures of earlier (I can't find the post I made right now). I was thumbing through that one a lot as inspiration for Vajra, actually -- I strongly suspect the characters I was coming up with were nothing like their actual counterparts on the page. (And if they were, I'd be both surprised and dismayed...)

Read more


Tags: Akira Kurosawa art books manga


Dharma Chameleon Dept.

Somewhere along the way I bumped into a snippet about Richard Gere getting a dressing-down from the Dalai Lama. It went something like this: the DL said [I'm paraphrasing], "Why do you make these movies? You are only piling illusion...

By Serdar Yegulalp on 2008/01/09 00:29

Somewhere along the way I bumped into a snippet about Richard Gere getting a dressing-down from the Dalai Lama. It went something like this: the DL said [I'm paraphrasing], "Why do you make these movies? You are only piling illusion on top of more illusion and leading people further astray."

I don't know if Mr. Gere had an answer for the DL, but had I been in Mr. Gere's shoes, my answer might have gone something like this:

Sometimes the only way to get people to see things as they truly are is to present them with an illusion. People sometimes respond more readily to a fiction, especially where something intimidatingly large is concerned; they can develop a better emotional liaison with something like that than they can a cold hard fact. This isn't a denigration, just the way things tend to play out. You can create a fiction that is positive and that is grounded in the way things actually are, or you can create something that is simply meant to be wallowed in. It's all in how it's used, and to what end. The trick, again, is to make sure that the other person knows what they're getting into; not everyone is going to appreciate being lied to without their knowing it, even if it leads to them to wisdom. You cannot lie willy-nilly and expect truth to grow out of that.

I'm really curious as to how that might have been responded to.

Read more


Tags: dharma


What Really Happened Dept.

I haven't posted much in the last month or so, and I know it. I've mainly been dividing my in-front-of-a-keyboard time between AMN, work and The New Golden Age, and between those three things I'm often left without a lot...

By Serdar Yegulalp on 2008/01/09 00:07

I haven't posted much in the last month or so, and I know it. I've mainly been dividing my in-front-of-a-keyboard time between AMN, work and The New Golden Age, and between those three things I'm often left without a lot to talk about. There's some other stuff going on that I'm not quite ready to talk about -- some personal projects and things which once they're settled should be absolutely worth discussing -- but again, right now really isn't the time for such things.

There's a saying, "The owl of Minerva flies at dusk," which seems to apply to what's going on here: sometimes the best way to really understand something is only after it's over and reflected on, and that's probably the best way to think about a couple of things that are taking place. (None of this is sinister or evil or anything like that; I'm probably just finding a particularly pretentious way to talk about something that, if done right, will turn out to be really nifty and well worth following up on.)

One thing I know I ought to do is empty out some of the music reviews that got stacked up; I sat down and wrote a ton of them in the space of a couple of days, and never got them cleaned up or formatted for presentation. Sometimes talking about a record I've loved for years is like talking about my front lawn: I see it every day, I know most every knoll in it, and to talk about it just seems like the purest act of redundancy imaginable. Hard thing, to get out of one's head, and see something else.

* * *

Most of my writing work has been directed at New Golden Age, as I've mentioned, and two other projects have been back-burnered in favor of that. One was NaNo 2007, aka Vajra (which I might come back to first; it's a really interesting story, the more I think about it); the other is Tensai Kenki, which the more I think about it the less certain I feel about anything in it except the itch to do it.

I dug out the Big Book of Projects the other day -- my scrapbook where I park possible story ideas and let them germinate -- and was amazed at how far I'd drifted away from some of them. In my Mind, which I think I mentioned indirectly here and there, is draft-complete and has been for some time, but the story itself is just so far removed from anything I know I want to dwell in (or on) that I don't have the hear to go back and make it into anything readable. It was basically my homage to No Longer Human, and I think I even managed to alienate myself from it, it was that reader-unfriendly.

I've decided, perhaps belatedly, that I'm no longer interested in trying to subject the reader to an endurance test as some kind of proof that either I or they are "worthy". Writing Summerworld reawakened for me the kinds of stories I wanted to tell, and in what form -- not gray little things about gray little people with gray little lives, but Technicolor and Dolby 7.1 sound and 1080p HD. And at the same time under the razzle-dazzle, a guiding sensibility about it all -- in short, everything I pulled off with that book, I'd like to do again and again, albeit in different contexts.

I always do keep busy, don't I?

Read more


Tags: writing


One Of Us Dept.

There's little that's more horrible than someone else going on this great vacation and coming back with a buncha photos and a lecture about this beach and that fishing spot and lookit all those people on the golf course --...

By Serdar Yegulalp on 2008/01/07 00:45

There's little that's more horrible than someone else going on this great vacation and coming back with a buncha photos and a lecture about this beach and that fishing spot and lookit all those people on the golf course -- and your head tilts right back off as you fall asleep.

Which is why I've been begging whatever deity that might be listening: please don't let The New Golden Age turn into a boring vacation travelogue. Please. That was a big part of why I took what was originally going to be this monster epic story that could easily have run to 250,000 words or more and filleted it down to less than half that. Somewhere in my Mess of Stuff there's a pre-treatment outline (just a bunch of scribbles, really), and I stumbled back across it not too long ago and read with horror that my original idea had been to stretch the action across not one but three separate conventions over the course of a year.

Travelogue. Vacation pictures. Bor-ring. Especially boring to the people who weren't there for any of it, who were never there for any of it -- and c'mon, the whole idea is to get people who were never there to read this, so why shoot myself in the feet and wait around for gangrene to set in on top of it?

Face it (the Author told himself), the whole thing's not even really about the conventioneering experience per se; that's just the environment, the backdrop, the arena for where people link up with each other and find a little bit of community that they don't have my default out there in the rest of the world. That's the real brain / spleen / internal organ mass pumping away under it all in there: we go do these things to feel that much more connected to others. A do-it-yourself sense of community for a generation and a society that seems to be turning up its nose as the very concept of same, which is either a great thing or scary as all shivering get-out the more you think about it.

Oh, and: a possible title change. I've honestly never liked the title all that much, and I have no gift for good, catchy titles; if I did, I probably would be in marketing. I mentioned The Four-Day Weekend as another possible title, to a friend of mine, and he commanded me to bear it in mind as a strong possibility. It, too, suffers from the "it's pretty good but could be better" disease.

Read more


Tags: writing


Swag Dept.

We had a belated birthday celebration here at my house for both myself and several friends -- backdated to December! Some of the stuff I got is worth mentioning, both because I may write about them in the Books or...

By Serdar Yegulalp on 2008/01/06 11:51

We had a belated birthday celebration here at my house for both myself and several friends -- backdated to December! Some of the stuff I got is worth mentioning, both because I may write about them in the Books or Music section and because they're interesting on their own merits.

I also ended up with the Blu-ray of Casino Royale (which gets better each time I watch it, actually), and a slew of other little things, but those were the big attention-getters.

Incidentally, after Warner Brothers's "we're dropping HD-DVD in 2008" announcement this Friday -- the weekend before CES, no less -- all that's left is for Criterion to follow suit. And when that happens I may in time be selling or auctioning (or just giving) away my existing Criterion discs as they're replaced. Obviously this isn't happening any time soon, but yes, I'm seriously jonesing about the idea of Ran in HD.

(No, DRM doesn't thrill me, either, but given the way the music industry is finally giving up on DRM wholesale, I don't think the movie industry will see much point in bothering for too much longer either. Not when the delivery mechanisms and retail prices are low enough to make piracy essentially not worth the effort. Warner Brothers didn't even bother to include Macrovision on most of the Harry Potter movies because they sold so well that to do so would have simply chiseled into their profits. Also, AFAIK, the Blu-ray Disc spec doesn't mandate copy protection, either; it's just one of the features available on the platform ... but any way you slice it the next few years are going to be really interesting.)

Read more


Tags: books movies


Books: Guin Saga: The Seven Magi Graphic Novel 2

This may sound paradoxical, but I have more fun writing about the hard sell than the easy sell. The easy sell, I almost fall asleep at the keyboard: Great series, but you know that, you’re probably buying it as I...

By Serdar Yegulalp on 2008/01/01 23:36
Buy at Amazon

This may sound paradoxical, but I have more fun writing about the hard sell than the easy sell. The easy sell, I almost fall asleep at the keyboard: Great series, but you know that, you’re probably buying it as I type this, zzz. The hard sell, I have to actually talk about the thing, instead of just remind people of what they probably already know.

So it goes with the Guin Saga Manga—the comic adaptation of one of the later books in the Guin Saga series, currently being released in paperback to what I hope will be a receptive and enthusiastic audience on this side of the Pacific. The manga, a three-volume cycle that covers a side story set much later in the Guin timeline than the novels we’re currently seeing, doesn’t require that you read any of Guin to understand what’s going on, but it does enhance the experience all the more. I still encouraged people to go out and snap up the first book sight unseen if they wanted a taste of something off the beaten path, and the second graphic novel keeps up the same level of exotic fascination.

Read more


Tags: Guin Saga Japan Kaoru Kurimoto Vertical Inc. manga review


Books: Andromeda Stories Graphic Novel 2

The first volume of Andromeda Stories dreamed big, took big risks, and got away with all of them. Here we had a far-future saga of man vs. machine that bristled with more creativity and wonder in its first book than...

By Serdar Yegulalp on 2008/01/01 23:35
Buy at Amazon

The first volume of Andromeda Stories dreamed big, took big risks, and got away with all of them. Here we had a far-future saga of man vs. machine that bristled with more creativity and wonder in its first book than many other manga do through the whole of their run. Now comesVolume 2, and I have the distinct feeling that if anything I might have under-rated this series. The second volume is even more adventurous and daring than the first—which means that if my math is right, the third volume will most likely cause my eyeballs to melt. There are worse ways to go, if you ask me.

Andromeda Stories (originally published from 1980 through 1982) was the brainchild of Keiko Takemiya—she of another outstanding space-fantasy epic, To Terra…—and noted Japanese SF author Ryu Mitsuse. It probably sounds like an unlikely collaboration from the outside; what would a shojo manga creator and an SF author be doing pooling their talents? But if you’ve read Terra, the parallels ought to be obvious: throughout Terra, you could sense Takemiya’s native fascination with the way SF can be used to make larger statements about identity and the place of the individual in the universe. I picked up strong parallels with another female SF luminary, Ursula K. Le Guin—in fact, for those familiar with Le Guin, Andromeda bears some vague thematic resemblances to her Hainish Cycle stories, although Takemiya and Mitsuse are unmistakably doing their own things with this work.

Read more


Tags: Japan manga review


Books: Dominion TPB (4th Edition)

Dominion dates back from 1986, but I don’t mean “dates” in the sense that it’s “dated.” In fact, it’s probably one of the better things Masamune Shirow has done: it’s relatively easy to follow, funny, spirited, and doesn’t confuse story...

By Serdar Yegulalp on 2008/01/01 23:34
Buy at Amazon

Dominion dates back from 1986, but I don’t mean “dates” in the sense that it’s “dated.” In fact, it’s probably one of the better things Masamune Shirow has done: it’s relatively easy to follow, funny, spirited, and doesn’t confuse story with mere ideas.

The problem I’ve long had with Shirow is that while he’s a fantastic visualizer and has thrown away more ideas than most people ever have, he’s been a pretty scattershot storyteller. Or, maybe better to say that over time he’s subordinated storytelling to simply throwing big uncooked lumps of ideas at the reader, and most of his best work is not really his but rather the work derived from his core concepts. Case in point: Ghost in the Shell. The original comic is actually only okay, and its follow-ups are virtually (pun intended) incoherent. It’s what other people have done with the idea that have really shone. Mamoru Oshii’s two films were dreamtime meditations on the ideas and characters brought up in the book, but it was Kenji Kamiyama’s TV series and subsequent movie that really kicked the whole thing up to the level where it deserved to be.

Read more


Tags: Japan Mamoru Oshii manga review


External Movie Reviews: Hell Girl Vol. #3: Cherry

The first clues about Hell Girl's origin, after some repetition.

By Serdar Yegulalp on 2008/01/01 23:33
Buy at Amazon

Now we’re really getting somewhere. The third volume of Hell Girl does what I enjoy most in a show—it takes its own conceits, turns them inside out, and sees what emerges. Instead of just running through the basic idea over and over again as it did in the earlier volumes, Hell Girl is now scrupulously questioning its own premises. What if, for instance, you send someone to hell as revenge, and that turns out to be what they want? Is it revenge if you give someone the punishment they secretly long for? I’m glad the show is finally becoming what it needs to be; I’m just a little frustrated it took this long.

Most of the episodes before Volume 3 featured a pretty cut-and-dried case of vengeance. Here, the stories now center around reporter Hajime, his daughter—who seems supernaturally connected to Hell Girl’s victims—and his dogged pursuit of the truth of the whole situation. The more he finds, the more disturbing a picture he pieces together—and the more his own nascent sense of morality starts shoving (inconveniently) to the surface. It’s no fun to realize you have a conscience after a lifetime of pretending you don’t, and the idea that someone would throw themselves away on revenge begins to mortally terrify him.

Read more


Tags: review


External Movie Reviews: Glass Fleet -La Legende du Vent de L'Universe- Vol. #3

I’ve written elsewhere that I would rather watch someone shoot high and go flat on their face than just play it safe and not take risks. The manga and anime I savor the most are the ones that stick their...

By Serdar Yegulalp on 2008/01/01 23:32
Buy at Amazon

I’ve written elsewhere that I would rather watch someone shoot high and go flat on their face than just play it safe and not take risks. The manga and anime I savor the most are the ones that stick their necks out, that dream big and have ambition to burn. Glass Fleet has 55-gallon drums full of ambition to burn—but burn that much of anything and you’re going to be blowing a lot of smoke, too.

So it goes with the third volume of Glass Fleet, full of adventure and intrigue and action and romance and politics—it’s practically the Christmas fruitcake of anime. And maybe 120% of everything is indeed too much: there are times when I wished they would, you know, tone things down just a tot. But then again, if they did, the show would lose the very over-the-top-ness that I’ve actually started to savor. Maybe the answer here is not to grouse about what needs to be changed but just to rack back the dosage: one or two episodes of this a week is about right.

Read more


Tags: review


External Movie Reviews: Mushi-shi Vol. #5

O Hell! what doe mine eyes with grief behold,Into our room of bliss thus high advanc'tCreatures of other mould, earth-born perhaps,Not Spirits, yet to heav'nly Spirits bright Little inferior … —Milton, Paradise Lost Thus spoke Satan on beholding Adam and...

By Serdar Yegulalp on 2008/01/01 23:31
Buy at Amazon

O Hell! what doe mine eyes with grief behold,
Into our room of bliss thus high advanc't
Creatures of other mould, earth-born perhaps,
Not Spirits, yet to heav'nly Spirits bright
Little inferior …

—Milton, Paradise Lost

Thus spoke Satan on beholding Adam and Eve in the Garden ofEden. The same sort of envy, or lust, seems to radiate from many of thecharacters in Mushi-shi whenever they encounter the mushi,the strange organisms that have been the focus of the show. They seethem not as forms of life unto themselves, not as things to co-existwith, but as something to be controlled and tamed, put to use,engineered into a solution for a problem that might not even reallyexist except in your head. And then comes Ginko, the mushi master who’sthe closest thing the show has to a hero—if only because he knowsbetter than to assume that life is something you can just shape at willto fix your problems, like putty filling a crack in a wall.

Over the course of the series we have learned that Ginkois hardly the only mushi-master out there—in fact, there’s a network ofthem with whole libraries and vast tracts of information at theirdisposal. What sets Ginko apart is his relatively enlightened attitude.He would rather deal with the mushi as things to be coaxed out and senton their way, not things that have to be exterminated ruthlessly. Healso understands, sometimes painfully well, that there will beoccasions when a mushi manifests and there will be no easy solution tothe problem it presents. There will be days when we are theproblem, not them, and when that comes about—well, I quote Miltonagain: “Hell shall unfould, / To entertain you two, her widest Gates, /And send forth all her Kings.”

Read more


Tags: review


Books: Guin Saga, The: Book 2: Warrior in the Wilderness

1979 was a pretty good year to be a fan. Look at what was in theaters: the first Star Trek movie; Alien; the animated Lord of the Rings flick. And there was an even bigger kick waiting for us in...

By Serdar Yegulalp on 2008/01/01 18:04
Buy at Amazon

1979 was a pretty good year to be a fan. Look at what was in theaters: the first Star Trek movie; Alien; the animated Lord of the Rings flick. And there was an even bigger kick waiting for us in the bookstores—the first installments in this awesome new fantasy series about this warrior with the head of a leopard.

No, wait. That last bit didn’t happen—at least, not here. But oh man, how I wish it had.

The copyright page of Book Two of The Guin Saga tells me: Originally published in Japanese as Koya no senshi by Hayakawa Shobo, Tokyo, 1979. There’s something intimidating about discovering that one of the best fantasies of 2008 was published in 1979—and all us poor suckers in the English-speaking territories are just now finding out about it.

Read more


Tags: Alexander O. Smith Guin Saga Kaoru Kurimoto Vertical Inc. review


External Movie Reviews: Witchblade Vol. #3

Three volumes in, and Witchblade is shaping up to be one of the better shows that’s come our way recently. At least some of that is due to the surprise factor, I think: I wasn’t expecting anythingfrom this Gonzo-produced adaptation...

By Serdar Yegulalp on 2008/01/01 18:03
Buy at Amazon

Three volumes in, and Witchblade is shaping up to be one of the better shows that’s come our way recently. At least some of that is due to the surprise factor, I think: I wasn’t expecting anythingfrom this Gonzo-produced adaptation of the American comic series, and what we’re getting is not just watchable but downright absorbing. This could have ended up being a throwaway product, but they took the time to make it a cut above, and I’m pleased they did.

Volume 3 pushes the story forward through several different realms at once, all stuff that’s been set up in the first two discs but now getting aggressively expanded on. Most central is the mystery of the X-Cons, the bizarre hybrid man-machine-monster things that Masane, wielder of the Witchblade, has been recruited to terminate with extreme prejudice. When one of them (an ex-cop, no less) comes a little too close to her daughter Rihoko, she goes to weapons-maker Doji Group leader Takayama—the man holding her leash—and demands answers. She gets them, all right, and doesn’t like at all what she hears. The X-Cons are an army of leftovers, defective experiments conducted with the dead bodies of humans. Masane now finds herself in the unenviable position of being a janitor of death, and when she registers her disgust about the whole thing, she gets back a chilling answer: “Isn’t it an army’s duty to protect the living?

Read more


Tags: review


Books: Tanpenshu Vol. #2

There’s got to be a way to talk about Tanpenshu #2 without scaring you all off. Think about it from my side, that’s all I ask. I’ve been trying to get this review written for two days, and I’ve shot...

By Serdar Yegulalp on 2008/01/01 13:11
Buy at Amazon

There’s got to be a way to talk about Tanpenshu #2 without scaring you all off.

Think about it from my side, that’s all I ask. I’ve beentrying to get this review written for two days, and I’ve shot moreblanks than a whole class full of third graders with cap guns. “Just goget the book,” I was tempted to write. “Just go and expose youselves tothis fire-eating, heart-unclogging piece of power, because it burns theb.s. right out of the soul, and anything that does that in this world is something to cherish and defend.”

That’s why I had such great things to say about Apollo’s Song and MW and Abandon the Old in Tokyo, which all hurt.Hurt like being slapped by someone you loved, right after you’d blurtedout something unbearably careless and hurtful to their face. So—and youcan see the dilemma by now—Q: Why then would anyone want to subject themselves to it?

A: Because of what you are when you come out the other side.

So goes the theory, anyway. In practice, most people are notinterested in giving themselves an aesthetic scourging that they’re notbeing tested on later. This is why Merzbow does not routinely outsellShakira, and the first volume of Tanpenshu didn’t hit the New York Times bestseller list (which is a crying shame).

Read more


Tags: Japan manga review


External Movie Reviews: Kanon Volume 1

A moé masterwork (by other accounts) gets its U.S. release.

By Serdar Yegulalp on 2008/01/01 13:07
Buy at Amazon

I’ll start with a confession: I’m no moe fan. Nossir. Not one bit.

And yet here I am, reviewing a moe story adapted from a bestselling visual novel, chock full of coincidence and long-standing promises and deep connections to the past. Sometimes you can elevate this sort of thing into the realm of art, as Makoto Shinkai did with 5cm/sec (also being released by ADV in 2008). But most of the time what we get is simply content to be a celebration of nostalgia and wistfulness for its own sake.

Read more


Tags: review


External Movie Reviews: Glass Fleet -La Legende du Vent de L'Universe- Vol. #2

The more I see of Glass Fleet, the more I slot it into what could be called the “good-bad-but-not-evil” category. Flawed or addled or fundamentally goofy as it might be, it is definitely not boring. It’s got plot contrivances you...

By Serdar Yegulalp on 2008/01/01 13:06
Buy at Amazon

The more I see of Glass Fleet, the more I slot it into what could be called the “good-bad-but-not-evil” category. Flawed or addled or fundamentally goofy as it might be, it is definitely not boring. It’s got plot contrivances you could drive the show’s trademark glass spaceship through, and it crosses Captain Herlock-style space opera withLe Chevalier d’Eon-style political intrigue to middling effect—but heck, it at least tries to stand apart from your typical middle-of-the-roadkill production. Give them gold stars for effort if nothing else.

Read more


Tags: review


Books: Real/Fake Princess Volume 5

The great thing about Real/Fake Princess, for me, has been how it has kept the complete courage of its convictions. The bare outlines of the story are fairly standard romance fodder: a man and a woman, each one fiery and...

By Serdar Yegulalp on 2008/01/01 10:19
Buy at Amazon

The great thing about Real/Fake Princess, for me, has been how it has kept the complete courage of its convictions. The bare outlines of the story are fairly standard romance fodder: a man and a woman, each one fiery and independent in their own ways, grow closer together during a shared crisis and discover love. There’s a billion romance novels with this plot, but how the plot is played out makes all the difference, and R/FP somehow, amazingly, never manages to make a wrong step.

The final volume of the series takes everything that has been building through the course of this story and pushes it all the way to the conclusion it deserves. I could not ask for more. It gives us the “real/fake” princess of the title, Zhi Li, now in hiding from her enemies in power, and reunited at last with both Wu and Hui Tang—both of whom she has powerful and conflicting feelings for—in a rebel encampment. There is a fair amount of other plotting swirling around them during this last volume, but the really important stuff involves Zhi Li and the two men in her life, and that’s what I’ll focus on here.

Read more


Tags: China manga review


Genji Press

Science fiction, rebooted.

Find recent content on the main index or look in the archives to find all content.

About Me

I'm an independent SF and fantasy author, technology journalist, and freelance contemplator for how SF can be made into something more than just a way to blow stuff up.

My Goodreads author profile.

Learn some more about me.

My Books

Out Now

Coming Soon

Previously Released

More about my books

Search This Site

Archives