Previous Posts: Uncategorized / General: November 2008

So Much For The Sideshow Dept.

Even if I didn't make it to 50,000 words this year, I still think NaNoWriMo was more than worth the effort. Now that Tokyo Inferno is "booted up" and running, I can slow down a little bit and concentrate on getting...


Even if I didn't make it to 50,000 words this year, I still think NaNoWriMo was more than worth the effort. Now that Tokyo Inferno is "booted up" and running, I can slow down a little bit and concentrate on getting more of it written at a pace that better suits my current lifestyle.

I've tried to prune out a lot of things from the way I live, as a way to get avoid getting too caught up in distractions, but in the end it always comes back down to a few basic things: my job, my family, my writing, and some online activities including this website. Any one of those things alone eats up a lot of time, and it gets worse when you factor in any number of other distractions that can simply throw themselves at you.

A few new things came my way, though. Among them is an author of the period that Tokyo Inferno is set in: Satō Haruo, author of The Sick Rose a/k/a Gloom in the Country. I stayed up a little later than I would have liked reading it; the beauty of the language and the author's fondness for the world of nature is downright scrumptious, some of the best sort of thing I've seen since Morio Kita's Ghosts.

I also popped in Love and Honor, and while a full review is of course pending, my quick impression is that it's a nice rounding-out to the trilogy of The Hidden Blade and When the Last Sword is Drawn. Old-fashioned, but not in the stifling way that Dora-heita was. (I also have Hana and both Genghis Khan movies waiting to be checked out when time [ha ha] permits.)


Tags: Japan movies Yoji Yamada


Burp Dept.

Those of you in the U.S. reading this, you know what that's all about -- but I'll elaborate anyway. I spent today with the folks -- it was a small but wonderfully arranged Thanksgiving dinner, with only myself, my wife,...


Those of you in the U.S. reading this, you know what that's all about — but I'll elaborate anyway. I spent today with the folks — it was a small but wonderfully arranged Thanksgiving dinner, with only myself, my wife, my parents, a friend of theirs (Betül) and her parents as well. Things were made all the more amusing by the fact that Betül's parents didn't speak English, but she was happy to provide a running translation in both directions for all of us. The best highlight of the evening in this respect was when my wife talked about the very last time she ever worked in retail (it's a potential story for the Customers Suck LiveJournal community, let me put it that way).

We went back home happy, stuffed, and almost needing a trailer hitch to carry back all the leftovers we were given. And since I was smart enough to do most of my holiday shopping across the course of the year, I'm spending tomorrow getting caught up on my reading and DVD watching, neener neener.


A Little Something To Go With Your Turkey? Dept.

How about some Chocolate? That's right -- the stupefying Thai martial-arts blowout that looks like it may well one-up or at least sit comfortably on the shelf next to Ong-bak is headed Stateside in Region A. And, yes, a conventional...


How about some Chocolate? That's right — the stupefying Thai martial-arts blowout that looks like it may well one-up or at least sit comfortably on the shelf next to Ong-bak is headed Stateside in Region A. And, yes, a conventional DVD edition is also coming out.

Also, Yokiro / The Geisha (Hideo Gosha) now has cover art. And another longtime favorite of mine, Vanishing Point, is getting the high-def treatment.

Enjoy the stuffing, everyone.


Tags: Blu-ray Disc Hideo Gosha Thailand


Spiritually Inclined Dept.

The second volume in the Moribito series of novels is set to come out next May. I'm watching the anime right now for a review -- do not wait for my word; GO GET IT....


The second volume in the Moribito series of novels is set to come out next May. I'm watching the anime right now for a review — do not wait for my word; GO GET IT.


Tags: anime light novel Moribito


Criterionizer Dept.

Criterion's new site is live! Aside from a redesign, they now offer a good many of their movies as streaming downloads for $5 a pop, and have trailers for quite a few others as well. Plus the ability to comment...


Criterion's new site is live! Aside from a redesign, they now offer a good many of their movies as streaming downloads for $5 a pop, and have trailers for quite a few others as well. Plus the ability to comment on or discuss titles, something I'm glad they made a native part of the site.


Tags: Criterion


Am I Blu(e) Dept.

The magnificently lush but ultimately disappointing Wonderful Days is being released domestically on Blu-ray as Sky Blue, courtesy of Tartan. It doesn't work as a story, but as pure filmmaking and imagery it's unparalleled....


The magnificently lush but ultimately disappointing Wonderful Days is being released domestically on Blu-ray as Sky Blue, courtesy of Tartan. It doesn't work as a story, but as pure filmmaking and imagery it's unparalleled.


Tags: anime Blu-ray Disc Korea


Cinema Paradiso Dept.

After my last post, I found myself thinking: If you were going to stage a film festival for North Korea (or some other country that has been under totalitarian rule with virtually no access to the outside world), what movies...


After my last post, I found myself thinking: If you were going to stage a film festival for North Korea (or some other country that has been under totalitarian rule with virtually no access to the outside world), what movies would you screen for them and why?

Here's my short list:

  • The Wizard of Oz. Not just because it's a musical, or a fantasy, or a cheery look at life (L. Frank Baum is long overdue for a cultural revival, especially since all his work is in the public domain at this point), but because it's a movie that most anyone from any culture can plug into in some fashion.
  • Ikiru. The unexamined life is not worth living, and this movie has for me long been one of the best embodiments of that. This is how to examine your life, and this is how to live it. It also contains, not incidentally, a very sly attack on the soul-deadening bureaucracies that are just as wretched in democratic states as they are in authoritarian ones.
  • To Kill a Mockingbird. For moral courage, and also for the sake of being a wonderfully-told story.
  • 12 Angry Men. Justice in a democratic society: difficult, messy, emotionally fraught, problematic, imperfect, and I'm not sure I'd want it any other way.
  • The Grapes of Wrath. Hard times made human.
  • Pan's Labyrinth. If only children have decency in the face of evil ...
  • Modern Times. My favorite Chaplin, and one that remains endlessly relevant to people in just about any society.
  • The 400 Blows. Youthful rebellion may well be the same everywhere.

I'd to include at least one animated production, and I'm leaning towards one of the Miyazaki films by default. But failing that, I could include something like Beauty and the Beast — one of the better Disney productions on all levels.


Tags: dharma movies


Northern Exposure Dept.

The Times has an absolutely fascinating piece about a film festival in North Korea -- one showing, amazingly, a fair clutch of movies from the forbidden West. I'm curious about seeing the recent North Korean production A Schoolgirl's Diary, which...


The Times has an absolutely fascinating piece about a film festival in North Korea — one showing, amazingly, a fair clutch of movies from the forbidden West.

I'm curious about seeing the recent North Korean production A Schoolgirl's Diary, which has apparently passed muster as good cinema with non-Korean audiences.


Tags: Korea links movies


Trip Out Dept.

Because this got posted so far back into the archive, there's a chance many people might not see it. My old review of Ya Ho Wha 13's colossal God and Hair 13-disc box set (the original, "big" Captain Trip...


Because this got posted so far back into the archive, there's a chance many people might not see it. My old review of Ya Ho Wha 13's colossal God and Hair 13-disc box set (the original, "big" Captain Trip pressing) has been reposted.

Even better: I have a copy of the thing for sale.

I don't have sound samples on me at the moment but I might add one later when I get another spare moment.


Tags: psychedelia


Boom Dot Bust Dept.

This week alone, two people I am on a first-name basis with lost their jobs. Both were with relatively small companies; in one case I'm fairly positive it was a case of belt-tightening that got dropped on his head an...


This week alone, two people I am on a first-name basis with lost their jobs. Both were with relatively small companies; in one case I'm fairly positive it was a case of belt-tightening that got dropped on his head an unexpectedly as it did anyone else's. The other one, I'm not so sure of, but I had the feeling the handwriting on that particular wall was not so illegible that he couldn't have made it out without some squinting. I don't think either of them were at fault for anything; everything I see tells me this is just another symptom of the lousy-and-getting-lousier economy and nothing more than that.

The last time I talked to either of these folks face-to-face was earlier in the year, when the economy looked shaky but $50-a-barrel oil and the implosion of the Rust Belt would have been seen as irresponsible doomsaying. And now I can only imagine what will happen in the next six months, although I try not to let such things preoccupy my thoughts — there's so much to do right in front of me that getting mired down in a general sense of catastrophe isn't going to help.

I hate saying anything as trite as "we'll get by", but that's the only thing I can come back to that feels remotely honest. Somehow, we muddle through — although I'd rather we be in a position where we didn't have to.

The last word I'll leave to my old friends Front 242:

We will stagger
Lose out bearings
On and on
Yes, there can be no
Obvious answers
As we move on, and on and on,
We must tremble
Lame and humble
On and on ... [*]


Tags: dharma


Trek Drek Dept.

I haven't had high hopes -- or much of any hope, really -- for J.J. Abrams's "reboot" of the Star Trek franchise. It doesn't have much to do with Abrams's skill as a filmmaker, really. For me, it breaks down...


I haven't had high hopes — or much of any hope, really — for J.J. Abrams's "reboot" of the Star Trek franchise. It doesn't have much to do with Abrams's skill as a filmmaker, really. For me, it breaks down like so:

  1. Star Trek, as a franchise, is creatively exhausted. It is played out. It needs to die off. But of course this will never happen, and so I have to turn to Reason #2.
  2. The biggest reason for this exhaustion is Paramount/Viacom, who after Gene Roddenberry's death accelerated the franchise's descent into, well, franchising. They may pick someone like Abrams to keep things moving, but in the end he's bound to deliver them the kind of movie they want to see.

Devin Faraci of CHUD put it this way, in his look at some sneak-preview footage of the movie:

... something tells me that these characters [the Trek crew] are going to be about endless 'snappy' banter that's never funny and barely counts as dialogue. This is what screenwriters Roberto Orci and Alex Kurtzman bring to all the material they write - terrible, tortured dialogue. They're blockbuster blueprinters, not real writers, and having them on this film is probably the greatest strike against it. ... They're exactly the sort of writers who are killing Hollywood, the writers whose ideas feel as formatted and predictable and friendly as their Final Draft scripts.

And that's the problem: "formatted" and "predictable" and "friendly" is exactly what ViaMount wants from Trek. They don't want anything edgy or daring or (gulp) new, because that doesn't put butts in theaters. Actually, never mind butts in theaters; if we go back to the algebra of the exhibitors being the real customers, what ViaMount cares about most is being able to sell the thing in as many territories as possible.

I grew up with old-school Trek, and I have an emotional connection to it that does not transpose easily. I'm fond of it because it is a product of another era, a time when people seemed genuinely afraid of looking forward because they felt like they would see only disaster. That was a time when you could put ad copy like "VALIANT KIRK! GLORIOUS SPOCK!" on the back of one of the James Blish novelization tie-ins and get away with it. It didn't seem silly or self-referential or parodic or wink-wink-nudge-nudge; there was no all-pervading mockery of such things that they had to fight through. People cared about the show because it was something entirely new, in both attitude and form.

That's why this whole thing just smacks of being wrong. It's a puppet play. It's not even a remake or a reboot; it's just another milking of a cow that was out to pasture a long time ago. And the fact that X million dollars is being pumped into it means that much less else out there that's going to be genuinely original.


Tags: movies Star Trek


Owning Up Dept.

The last couple of night's catch-up for NaNo / Tokyo Inferno came out a little better than I thought -- I'm still behind, but not as grotesquely as I was before. One of the beauties of last night's run was getting...


The last couple of night's catch-up for NaNo / Tokyo Inferno came out a little better than I thought — I'm still behind, but not as grotesquely as I was before.

One of the beauties of last night's run was getting to a point where I understand now what the story is truly about and where it is headed. It was a kind of cards-on-the-table moment, where all the things that mattered most were finally spread out in front of me, and I could see how they were relating to each other.

Something I've had to accept with this book is that it is not the book I started out to write, but that is not a bad thing. The book I set out to write was nothing more than an idea; the book you write is the book you end up with, and it has the benefit of being something you can actually shape and work with. An idea is nothing more than that.

Curiously enough, Janet Fitch (of White Oleander) chimed in earlier this week in the NaNo Pep Talk email with some notes to that effect:

Working on White Oleander, I kept hitting this wall, about chapter 8. It was all going great, all the wheels in motion, and then WHAM. I just couldn't decide what to do next.  ... Luckily I was seeing an amazing therapist at the time. ... And she gave me the piece of advice which has saved my writing life over and over again, and I will give it to you, absolutely free of charge. She said, "I know it feels like you have all these options and when you make a decision, you lose a world of possibilities. But the reality is, until you make a decision, you have nothing at all." [Emphasis mine]

When I was barely twenty, I was in what amounted to a doomed collaborative project with another writer. Doomed because neither of us really understood how to pull off or sustain something of the size or scope that we wanted to attempt, and because we were both fairly immature and hotheaded in our own respective ways. We had at least some idea of what we were going to write; my take was, let's just start writing the damn thing and, you know, revise it after. His take was that we had to get everything locked down exactly right beforehand, and so that meant endless rounds of actually writing very little. In the end, we went our separate ways for other reasons, and as far as I know that project hasn't moved forward an iota since. (And, from what I can tell, nothing of value was lost.)

I have to wonder how much of the hesitancy on his part was fear of failure — or, to be more writerly about it, fear of having to endure the drudgery of rewriting. Not all of us are Yukio Mishima, capable of producing a clean first draft that would almost inevitably be sent to the publisher's in exactly that condition. For him, rewriting seemed like an admission of failure in some respect. Well, sure it is — and if you can't admit to a failure of any scope, even a creative project (to say nothing of learning from the mistake), then that doesn't say much about you as a person, or a creator.


Tags: creativity NaNoWriMo writing


Shadow Play Dept.

Now how the hell did this slip past me!? Director Barbet Schroeder has adapted Edogawa Rampo's short novel The Beast in the Shadows (in English; see Black Lizard). It apparently took a beating in the press, but I'm still wildly...


Now how the hell did this slip past me!? Director Barbet Schroeder has adapted Edogawa Rampo's short novel The Beast in the Shadows (in English; see Black Lizard). It apparently took a beating in the press, but I'm still wildly curious about the adaptation. Apparently it's a French coproduction, which makes sense given Rampo's fame in that country (although he continues to remain relatively obscure in English).


Tags: Barbet Schroeder Edogawa Rampo France Japan movies


Mighty Dark Out Dept.

I haven't read the Twilight books. I probably never will, at this rate. After all the negative press from people whose tastes I trust, the well has been poisoned so thoroughly that not even a Superfund cleanup would help. What...


I haven't read the Twilight books. I probably never will, at this rate. After all the negative press from people whose tastes I trust, the well has been poisoned so thoroughly that not even a Superfund cleanup would help.

What I have heard about the books set off alarm bells all up and down my critical faculties, so you can imagine my surprise when I read a critique of the books from a story-construction POV and found that other people were already roasting Twilight for things I suspected it was guilty of. One of the biggest was the relationship between the two principal characters, which sounded creepy / stalkerish in a way that didn't serve the story in the slightest.

Then I read this gem, on a board dedicated to giving the Twilight books a thorough dressing-down:

... just because something is fantasy does not mean it is unrealistic. The object of writers is to make you believe the story they are telling ... A good fantasy can utilize the idea of soulmates (like Richard and Kahlan in Terry Goodkind's Sword of Truth series) while still taking time to develop the relationship and the characters in a believable fashion. Attraction =/= everlasting love. Everlasting love happens when you get two people who understand, respect, and enjoy the other in terms of personality and character. Edward's hotness and Bella's delicious blood do not a soulmate make. And justifying the pitiful relationship development with "it's fantasy" is only a crude cop-out reserved for those with no understanding of good storytelling. [*]

That sums it so succinctly there's very little I can add on my own, but here goes.

The other day a friend of mine who'd read both Summerworld and The Four-Day Weekend mentioned that she liked Summerworld, but adored 4DW. The former was fantasy, albeit well-tooled; the latter was her life writ small, and there was so much in it that she recognized and was able to plug right into. I admitted that had been exactly what I was aiming for, but with both books: in Summerworld there's a lot that goes on which is outlandish and fantastic, but it's all rooted in real human need and behavior. It doesn't come out of (or go into) a vacuum. I don't mind a story that features people who suck each other's blood and turn into monsters. I do mind a story that would pretend the logical emotional consequences of such things can be simply hand-waved aside or turned into emotional pornography — which, from the sound of it, is what Twilight's really, really good at.

People are not heroes because the author tells us so, but because the heroes go out and demonstrate their heroism. Guin is a hero: he sticks his neck out first when there's trouble; he takes responsibility for his actions when they fail and credits those who helped him when they succeed; he keeps his sense of humor about him; he never says die. He makes Edward look like the flabby, sullen wimp he is. Now: which one of these two book franchises is currently selling like mad?


Tags: dharma fantasy Four-Day Weekend Guin Saga Summerworld writing


Quantum Mechanic Dept.

Me and the missus caught a whole buttload of commercials and trailers for $10 each, at the local multigigaplex. Oh, and there was a free movie, too: Quantum of Solace. It was a good-if-somewhat-shy-of-great followup to Casino Battle Royale --...


Me and the missus caught a whole buttload of commercials and trailers for $10 each, at the local multigigaplex. Oh, and there was a free movie, too: Quantum of Solace. It was a good-if-somewhat-shy-of-great followup to Casino Battle Royale — you know, the Bond movie where he ends up on the island with all those high school students all rigged to explode if he says the word "Moneypenny."

</joking>

For a movie that runs 1h 45m including credits, it was surprisingly jammed and edited for maximum density. I was genuinely unsure when I could safely sneak out to the bathroom, but my timing turned out to be spot-on: I left and came back during one of the two or three lulls in the whole movie.

There was no J.J. Trek trailer attached to the print I saw, amazingly. There were trailers for Valkyrie (which looked mighty neefty, Tom Cruise notwithstanding) and the new Will "Serious As An Academy Award" Smith flick Seven Pounds.


Tags: movies


In February Dept.

It wouldn't be a complete month without some new Criterion announcements, would it? Oh happy day! Luis Buñuel's The Exterminating Angel, long unavailable on video in the U.S. (you lucky PAL folks have had copies for a while now), is...


It wouldn't be a complete month without some new Criterion announcements, would it?

  • Oh happy day! Luis Buñuel's The Exterminating Angel, long unavailable on video in the U.S. (you lucky PAL folks have had copies for a while now), is getting the Crit treatment. It's a 2-disc set with goodies galore.
  • And also from Buñuel, Simon of the Desert, a lesser-known short subject that Criterion's packaging with a 1995 documentary about the film to make it worth the full price. (I would personally have preferred this to just be packed with Angel.)
  • Godfather of America indie / improv cinema, John Cassavetes, has long been served well by Criterion. Now we get single-disc issues of Faces and Shadows, which are about as essential as it gets from him. (Also be sure to check out the box set.)
  • Before David Lean became synonymous with epic (shilling for ponderous) filmmaking, he directed ten other movies between 1942 and 1955. Hobson's Choice, from 1954, stars none other than Charles Laughton — he who once went behind the camera himself to create Night of the Hunter, his one and only film. As Danny Peary put it, he was in the same league as Leonard (Honeymoon Killers) Kastle: a director whose batting average for masterpieces was 1.000.

Tags: Criterion David Lean John Cassavetes Luis Buñuel


Amazonified Dept.

Time for some Amazon catch-up… Hideo Gosha's gone underrepresented for far too long on video in the U.S., but here and there some of the most crucial bits of his filmography have been coming out (like Sword of the Beast,...


Time for some Amazon catch-up…


Tags: Amazon.com Blu-ray Disc Criterion Japan Martin Scorsese movies


Crosspost To LiveJournal [V.0.4]

Note: You can now access this page through a TinyURL shortcut: http://tinyurl.com/6cr2uu This is a simple index template I whipped up to allow people to crosspost their most recent Movable Type entries to a LiveJournal account. Revision History 0.4: Website-specific...


Note: You can now access this page through a TinyURL shortcut: http://tinyurl.com/6cr2uu

This is a simple index template I whipped up to allow people to crosspost their most recent Movable Type entries to a LiveJournal account.

Revision History

0.4:

  • Website-specific variable controls.

0.3:

  • Results are posted to auto-revealing IFRAME.
  • Now shows list of all posts on main page.
  • Floating, collapsible post-navigation list.
  • Navlist auto-collapses after nav action.
  • Jump-to-top shortcut at each post.

0.2:

  • Extended entry text is automatically placed behind an lj-cut tag.
  • Text input areas resized.
  • Link back to original post.
  • Option to post summary + entry only.
  • Some other formatting changes.

0.1: First version. Verrry primitive!

Licensing

This script is released under the terms of the MIT Public License.

Setup

1. Create a new index template with the template type as "Custom Index Template", the file extension as .php, and the publishing option as "Static". The exact naming and location is entirely up to you, so long as you can access it without too much hassle. Note that if your publishing options vary you can change either of these to suit, but these are the defaults that work for me. I prefer to publish it as index.php in a directory all its own.

2. Add the following text to the template, and save and publish it:

Crosspost to LJ version 0.4 code (UTF-8 text)

3. Edit the variables in the section labeled "Set variables here for your website/LJ". This contains your LiveJournal username and password (as LJUSR and LJPWD), the password you'll use to access this page (under PWD), a graphic icon you can use at the top of the page (ICON), and the link to your LiveJournal account (LJ)

If you want to change the options to leave comments, set the prop_opt_nocomments value to 0.

In my personal version of the script, I have it off by default and just append a link to the bottom of every post that links back to the original post:

<p>[<a href="<mt:EntryPermalink>">Comment here</a>]</p>

4. Save and publish the results.

Usage

Bookmark the index template and add the parameter ?pwd=<your password set as PWD above>.

Whenever you publish a new entry, go to that page and you'll see text boxes that contain the subject, body of the post, and the tag list. I've left the fields open for editing, but for the most part you don't need to change anything. Click "Post to LJ" and you should see a confirmation message from the LJ servers, along with the URL of your new post.

You'll also see text boxes for each of the posts you've made that are now showing up on the front page. This is useful if you want to post older stuff to LJ (for instance, after an outage).

The "Post list" that floats at top right contains a quick list of all the posts available on this page. Click "Show" to browse the list and "Hide" to close it up. Note that when you click any entry on the list, the list automatically hides after one second.

To Do

Better security handling. Hard-coding the password in the template and sending it in plaintext is not secure, period. I plan to do something about this in the future, but right now there are a few things you can do on your own to ameliorate these issues. You can, for instance, hard-code only the username and poll the user for the password by unhiding the password field. I'll probably make this into an option at some point.

As of 0.4, I now prompt for some kind of password as a pwd= parameter in the URL. Again, scarcely industrial-strength, but it'll keep out most casual discovery. (I'm looking into a way to make this play nice with MT's own native login system, actually, but that's a long way off.)

More options. The template only has the most minimal option set. It doesn't let you change the mood or anything else, which are things I want to see if I can pick up from the original post depending on how users have things set up.

The possibility of crossposting to other systems. I'm using Facebook and Twitter a bit more, for instance, so I'm looking at turning this into a general framework for crossposting to multiple services without needing a plugin. That will come much later, though.


Tags: LiveJournal Movable Type programming


Absolute Elsewhere Dept.

Some stuff from the link backlog: A profile of author Lewis Hyde, a poet's poet and a Genius Grant recipient now hard at work on a manuscript about the Creative Commons: One of two reviews of Roberto Bolaño's mammoth 2666,...


Some stuff from the link backlog:

  • One of two reviews of Roberto Bolaño's mammoth 2666, which I eventually intend to read after I finish getting through The Savage Detectives. That book's slow going not because it's bad, but because it's so good: you want to chew and savor every sentence and make it last as long as humanly possible.
  • A review of Into the Picture Scroll, a fascinating-sounding film about the way the arts influence each other and interpenetrate. All the more interesting since the picture scroll in question is the story of (who else?) Ushiwakamaru a/k/a the young Yoshitsune, avenging his mother's fate at the hands of the Taira.
  • Speaking of Ushiwakamaru, apparently there's a very good sushi place in the city by the same name. I've made a mental note to stop by there.
  • The long, long out-of-print Listen Up! The Lives Of Quincy Jones is coming back out on DVD. I hung onto my LaserDisc copy for years, in fear that this would never be reissued, but Warner Brothers has seen fit to make us happy people once again. (Minor gripe: the lack of the original, extremely striking poster artwork which was deliberately designed to look like a misprint and also echoes the movie's deliberately jittery visual and editing aesthetics.)
  • A new theory of mental disorder blames an imbalance of inherited genetic dispositions for many of the things that can go wrong. As with most theories this bold, the truth probably consists of some piece of this rather than the whole, but the conceit alone ought to draw plenty of dialogue. I wonder what Oliver Sacks would think of this.

Tags: eats links movies NYC Roberto Bolaño writing Yoshitsune


Sheer Luck Dept.

One of the defects of JustTheDisc, despite my undying love for it, is how anything with a Japanese title is rendered incorrectly. Whenever such a thing shows up, you have to do a lot of "reverse engineering" (read: blind guesswork)...


One of the defects of JustTheDisc, despite my undying love for it, is how anything with a Japanese title is rendered incorrectly. Whenever such a thing shows up, you have to do a lot of "reverse engineering" (read: blind guesswork) to find out what some of those things are. It's like an intelligence test: if you pass, you get rewarded with some amazingly rare and wonderful material.

During my last buying spree, I came across something with the title J.A.??????~??????. I wondered if this was a J.A. Seazer release — yes, he of the Utena soundtracks and one of the bigger swathes of Japanese underground psychedelia this side of Keiji Haino and Fushitsusha. I was familiar with him long before Julian Cope's Japrocksampler sold me on the necessity of having at least one of his albums around the house, but his stuff has been terribly pricey and goes in and out of print the way the moon changes phases.

The only way I could even begin to guess which disc it might be was to count the track numbers, count the characters in each track, and compare them against everything in his discography that might match the title in some fashion. Try to imagine my shock when I realized it was Kokkyou Junreika (国境巡礼歌), one of his most sought-after and blitzed-out records — copies of which routinely change hands for $100 or more. And here I was staring at a copy for $3 — granted, without the cover art, but who cared? And even if it wasn't that disc, $3 was not a big gamble to take.

The order showed up yesterday. My guesswork paid off. I'll be writing a review of the disc sometime this weekend.


Tags: epic win J.A. Seazer Japan Just The Disc loot music psychedelia


While Supplies Last Dept.

Criterion's having a clearance sale in preparation for the inauguration of their new warehouse -- everything on hand is available for 40% off. Go get it....


Criterion's having a clearance sale in preparation for the inauguration of their new warehouse — everything on hand is available for 40% off. Go get it.


Tags: Criterion


Consumerism Dept.

I've created the CDs For Sale page, where you can buy spare copies of some of the discs I've reviewed. Look for new ones there from time to time. Addendum: Audio samples from the discs in question also show up...


I've created the CDs For Sale page, where you can buy spare copies of some of the discs I've reviewed. Look for new ones there from time to time.

Addendum: Audio samples from the discs in question also show up on that page.


Troublemakers and Hard Workers Dept.

People are perennially curious about the personalities of artists, healthy and dysfunctional alike. Small wonder the biographies of authors capture my attention. Easy example: I dug up not one but two separate biographies of Yukio Mishima—one by John Nathan,...


People are perennially curious about the personalities of artists, healthy and dysfunctional alike. Small wonder the biographies of authors capture my attention. Easy example: I dug up not one but two separate biographies of Yukio Mishimaone by John Nathan, the other by Henry Scott-Stokes. Nathan’s was shorter but that much more precise and insightful; the Scott-Stokes work was more rambling and speculative, with a great many digressions about Japanese society that Nathan’s book dealt with a good deal more succinctly.

Aside from the way Nathan’s book dives headfirst into Mishima’s life — he was given an unprecedented level of access to the man’s world by the author’s widow — what caught my fascination the most was Mishima’s compulsive way of contrasting himself against other writers. In his early years, right after WWII, he met Osamu Dazai and told him, flat-out, “I don’t like your writing.” Mishima was downright straight-edge compared to Dazai, a compulsive dissolute whose suicide attempts, extramarital dabblings and drug addictions were already the stuff of legend. But as Mishima admitted later on in an interview, much of his outward “health” was itself a contrast: he was healthy on the outside so he could afford the luxury, as it were, of being sick on the inside.

No society exists without some level of tension between it as a whole and its artists, and the way it manifests in Japan in particular is fascinating to me. I suspect one way Japanese society deals with the artist as an unpredictable quantity is to make it possible to be an artist in a way that is at least marginally predictable. Hence the way, for instance, a manga artist will have the direction of his work planned and dictated to a fair degree by his editor. I’d guess it’s a lot easier today, as opposed to thirty years ago, for a novelist or artist-in-the-abstract to not only make a living but earn a measure of respect from everyone who’s not an “artist” themselves.

It probably helps if you’re a best-selling author — or, as Mishima’s father put it to him, if he was going to quit a good government job and become a writer, he had to become the best in the land. He certainly gave it his college best. Mishima had a six-volume collected works edition published before he was even thirty. Had he not elected to turn the last few years of his life into an extended deathwish, he might well still be writing today (he’d be 83 or so by my math), and most likely fulminating at what he perceived as the further decline of his country. In a revised edition of his book on Mishima, Scott-Stokes speculated about that; he had no doubt Mishima would be shaking his head at the rise of anime and manga as the most immediately visible expression of Japanese culture in an international context.

Most successful artists — whether from Japan or anywhere else — tend to adopt a workmanlike attitude about what they do best. This isn’t an argument that more is better; rather, more creates more opportunities to be better. Manga-ka — and the new breed of light novelists like NISIOISIN, come to think of it — produce at a pace that would have made Mishima proud. Prolificacy is solid evidence of hard work, and if you’re in a field as commercially volatile as writing, the more you can do and the more you have done, the better you’ll survive tough times. (I’m not sure if any Japanese authors ever approached the staggering level of volume produced by Georges Simenon, though, but I’d think of him as a fluke in any country.)

(On a side note, I’m not sure I ever subscribed to the warmed-over romanticism that dictates all artists must be Suffering Beasts that Transmute their Agony into Glory, or somesuch nonsense. It’s a thinly-disguised bit of revenge, really — a way to keep the act of creation something mystical and deliberately weird, instead of something commonplace and ordinary but no less wonderful regardless.)


Tags: creativity Georges Simenon Japan Osamu Dazai writing Yukio Mishima


Epic Fail and Epic Win Dept.

I rented Bertolucci's 1900 and The Last Emperor (the new Criterion edition) from the library, since I'd been meaning to check out both. The former's been re-released in its full 315-minute uncut edition and the latter I'd seen in theaters...


I rented Bertolucci's 1900 and The Last Emperor (the new Criterion edition) from the library, since I'd been meaning to check out both. The former's been re-released in its full 315-minute uncut edition and the latter I'd seen in theaters — and loved — but was wildly curious about the extended cut as well.

What I saw of 1900, though, was a mess — it barely seemed like the same director as The Conformist. What was I to make of a beautifully-lit and -photographed opening scene where Donald Sutherland's character flees from pitchfork-wielding peasants, only to end up looking like something out of a horror movie that even Troma wouldn't have picked up? What was I to make of scenes that mixed brilliance and incompetence, and interlarded epic vistas with unbearably frothy acting and plotting, often in the same shot? What to say about how Bertolucci took upwards of five hours and change to tell a muddle of a story that barely lent itself to synopsizing, let alone watching in depth?

Ebert was lucky enough (?) to see the "shortened" cut of 1900 — four-something hours — back when it first premiered, and lamented the fact that it got shown at all when it could easily have become a lost classic and been hailed without everyone ever needing to sit through a single interminable minute of it. One of his oft-repeated quotes is that no good movie is ever too long and no bad one ever too short, and if 1900 had been hacked down to ninety minutes I suspect that would have been a blessing.

All this brought to mind a question: what constitutes an epic, and why? From what I've seen it's not just length or scope; there has to be something else, some larger vision that is part of the movie's philosophy or construction. (I'm limiting myself to movies for now.) So to that end here's a quick rundown of the things that I would tag with "epic", or which other people would apply the label to freely:

  • I liked The Lord of the Rings as a film without ever really being in love with it, and I am not sure how much of that is due to not having marinated my imagination (so to speak) in the books while growing up. I suspect a good deal of the scope of the films is out of a need — dictated by the fans of the books — to stay true to just about every plot element in the original stories. The books themselves are actually not that long; I'd venture that all three plus The Hobbit are not that much heftier in terms of word count than the first volume of the elephantine Wheel of Time. The movies have scope and vision, but are not terribly sophisticated as storytelling — and perhaps don't need to be, with source material like that to draw on.
  • Traffic clocks in at 147 minutes — downright svelte compared to LotR — but deserves the label epic thanks to two things: a) its interweaving of multiple plot lines (always a good way to push a story into epic territory, really), and b) its greater sense of moral ambiguity and ongoing conflict. It doesn't have any one simple, distilled thing to say about "the drug war", and for that reason it becomes that much more expansive and timeless.
  • Nobody mentions epics without talking about Lawrence of Arabia and Gone with the Wind, and again those two rack up because of their scope, their characterizations, and their degrees of ambiguity. GWTW is a lot more straightforward of a story than LoA, but in my eyes it's held up over time as much more than a glossy soap opera. The former comes across as raw, undiluted experience, thanks at least in part to Robert Bolt's lean and nearly minimalist screenplay, and the single best use of widescreen photography, bar none.
  • Kurosawa. Seven Samurai, Ran  — there's scarcely a movie of his that doesn't classify as an epic, thanks to many of the factors discussed above. He didn't just fill the screen with things to look at, but people to care about and ideas to contemplate (the latter being something you typically did after it was over).

Sum of comments: Epic is what's inside plus what's outside. When both are big, when we can connect with both of them at the same time, that's what epic is all about.


Tags: Akira Kurosawa Bernardo Bertolucci epics movies Roger Ebert


When I Have Time Dept.

The grind of dealing with "NaNo":http://www.nanowrimo.org, work and various family obligations has left me a little winded, so there hasn't been much time for me to post casual stuff. * _Infernal Affairs_ is finally getting a domestic Blu-ray edition (on...


The grind of dealing with "NaNo":http://www.nanowrimo.org, work and various family obligations has left me a little winded, so there hasn't been much time for me to post casual stuff. * _Infernal Affairs_ is finally getting a domestic Blu-ray edition (on 11/18). I was stupefied at how _bad_ the remake, Scorsese's _Departed_, was — it was quite possibly the worst film I've seen from him since _Cape Fear_, laughably amateurish and lacking all of the gravity that made the original movie not only work as a thriller but catch fire as a story. The fact that Scorsese got consolation Oscars for that drivel only made it harder to stomach. * Criterion's _El Norte_ will probably end up being one of my first acquisitions from their Blu-ray catalog. I remember seeing it ages ago on VHS and even then being hugely impressed with it. It was one of those films that many of us watched in class, but I ended up renting it on my own. The "immigrant experience" is not the same for all immigrants, of course — my parents were far luckier than most — but Nava's film still felt incredibly relevant. I imagine it still will. * A Blu-ray edition of _Death Trance_?! Apparently, yes. Thank you, Tokyo Shock. I need to get around to reviewing this sucker, since I already did the screenshots from the DVD edition and the movie is about thirteen different kinds of awesome and win all blended together and topped off with Tak Sakaguchi.

Tags: Blu-ray Disc Criterion Hong Kong Japan movies Tokyo Shock


Ballot Box Dept.

Politics behind the jump....


Politics behind the jump.

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This page is an archive of entries in the Uncategorized / General category from November 2008.

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