Previous Posts: Uncategorized / General: July 2008

Vocabulary Dept.

The other day someone used the word "sheeple" in response to a blog post. The original post was about someone who had used an unconventional bit of formatting in their book, and the reply was ... well, the fact that...


The other day someone used the word "sheeple" in response to a blog post. The original post was about someone who had used an unconventional bit of formatting in their book, and the reply was ... well, the fact that the word "sheeple" was involved should tell you something about where they were coming from and what their view was. (Out of politeness to everyone involved, I won't link the post and response; I've tried to be as accurate as possible in my rendition of what was going on.)

Many years ago, I used to know someone who used the word "sheeple" a great deal, and that person's use of it was almost inevitably fulsome and elitist. The not-so-unspoken insinuation was: All those people out there are mindless stumbling herds of morons, present company excepted of course. The more I learned about this person, the more I realized he had no right to such unearned contempt for "the masses", especially when he hadn't done a thing in his life to elevate himself above them ... except grouse about how his genius had gone unrecognized by the sheeple.

As I put it to a friend the other day, the only person you should worry about or angst over feeling superior to is the guy you were yesterday.


Tags: dharma


*Phut* Dept.

It's possible to be exhausted and happy at the same time, but I think I've discovered new prolongations of each this time around. I got back from OSCON way early this morning -- my flight lapsed over into the a.m.,...


It's possible to be exhausted and happy at the same time, but I think I've discovered new prolongations of each this time around. I got back from OSCON way early this morning — my flight lapsed over into the a.m., but after catching some sleep on the plane and a nap after arriving home I think my clock is about back to normal. I found it funny that Louis Suarez-Potts doesn't believe in jet lag, or so he told me at the con - maybe he's just found a way to cope with it that's so seamless it gets dialed down to near-invisibility?

I didn't manage to visit Powell's — but I did visit the "satellite" stores at PDX, and between that and the Barnes & Noble at the mall directly behind the hotel (shame on me, I know), I came away with a good deal of material that kept me awake on the plane:

  • Joseph Mitchell, My Ears Are Bent. I have the feeling Piet would love this book — it's a collection of 1930s-era reportage by the titular author, a time where Chesterfields in the mug, fedoras, endless cups of black coffee and jiggling the phone hook for the operator were the stock-in-trade of reporters all around. Every time I read something like this, I get a grudging nostalgia for rattletrap Underwood typewriters.
  • Crime and Punishment. Yes, this old chestnut, but this is a more recent and far more vigorous translation than the one we were force-fed in college. I started reading it without expecting to get past the first few pages and devoured nearly half the book on the plane ride.
  • Natsuo Kirino, Grotesque. I still need to write a review of this woman's jaw-rattling Out — that book, like this one, doesn't deserve an easy category like "crime fiction" or even the "feminist noir" label that's been plastered rather . Out was made (badly) into a movie in Japan, and is evidently being re-made domestically in a version that hews closer to the book's original heart-as-black-as-ink of darkness. Grotesque takes a technique only used towards the end of Out — a multiple-POV trick used to fully document an incident in all of its aberrant ugliness — but does it bookwide, and the end result is not gimmicky but chilling as all hell. Kirono's new novel Real World is also on my to-read list.
  • Robert Greene, The 33 Strategies of War. Jury's out for now on whether this is insightful or just tripe-ful. The strategies themselves are not the problem — it's Greene's examples (e.g., Thatcher's administration in Britain being bolstered by her handling of the Falklands campaign) that seem like a case of regressively fitting an interpretation of facts to support his theses. I suspect Greene is a far better student of strategy than history or politics.

Tags: books loot travel


Forty-Two Dept.

After a bit more tire-kicking I've upgraded to the newest pre-release beta of Movable Type 4.2, which fixed some issues I was having with cached templates not rebuilding correctly. I'm still tweaking some of the template layouts as well,...


  1. After a bit more tire-kicking I've upgraded to the newest pre-release beta of Movable Type 4.2, which fixed some issues I was having with cached templates not rebuilding correctly. I'm still tweaking some of the template layouts as well, so you might see some minor shifting-around of things in the weeks to come.
  2. OSCON is next week in Portland, OR. I'll be attending in my official work capacity and covering the show in depth. And checking out Powell's Books, time permitting!
  3. An excerpt or two from Four-Day Weekend, along with a FAQ page for same, should be going up by the end of July. I'm also trying to knock together some cover art for it as well, and put up links and notes about the other books that are available from my back catalog. A lot of this was incumbent on MT 4.2 getting stable, and now I think I've reached a point where there will be no more really major architectural changes in my setup. (A man can dream.)
  4. You've probably seen the trailer for Watchmen by now. If you haven't, get your butt over to the Apple Quicktime site and get excited. The Dark Knight will have to wait until I get back from my trip, but it's on the list of things to do, trust me (along with Hellboy 2, and WALL·E and Kung Fu Panda, and...)
  5. The kind folks at Vertical sent me a number of books I'm trying to get caught up on: Lala Pipo and Parasite Eve are the two biggest, and I'm hoping having a five-hour flight will give me a chance to get caught up on my review material.
  6. Back earlier in the week when I was with my folks to celebrate Mom's 64th birthday, I stopped on through The Strand and found some goodies cheap: Yoshihiro Tatsumi, Goodbye (third anthology of manga from this master, courtesy of American "serious comics" publishers Drawn & Quarterly); Peter Biskind, Gods and Monsters (anthology of writing about film); Complete Writings of Mencius (includes Chinese text and English translation); Claymore 1-3; and Yukio Mishima's Madame de Sade.

Tags: books family links loot Movable Type movies travel Vertical Inc.


Taste Less, Pt. 2 Dept.

I think I got more responses -- and more good ones -- about yesterday's post than I've received about nearly anything I've posted lately. I went back and took another look at it, and realized a lot of what I...


I think I got more responses — and more good ones — about yesterday's post than I've received about nearly anything I've posted lately. I went back and took another look at it, and realized a lot of what I was talking about were not things that were inherent in the quote itself but things which I brought to it on my own, and that was a bad thing to do.

First, to me, the idea that there's just "stuff you like" and "stuff you don't like" is self-limiting, because once you consciously embrace that as a way to define your tastes, a whole galaxy of other possibilities get knocked out of the box. It sounds like an argument from ignorance, and that's why I felt like the mounted attack on it seemed on target.

But that doesn't excuse all the other things that were wrong with the attack: its mean-spiritedness, for one — and now that I look at it again, the way the responder uses the premise to put words in the other person's mouth, which pretty much invalidates the whole enterprise. It may well be true that "There's just music you like and music you don't like" is a prelude to warding off any objective criticism, as was claimed, but the original posted didn't actually do that — that was something the other guy pre-emptively accused him of. (Assuming that such a thing wasn't snipped out due to my own ham-handedness with preserving the quote.)

I don't like the idea of not subjecting one's own tastes to a little analysis, but it's not much good if you come to that conclusion by steamrolling and logic-chopping, is it?


Tags: criticism dharma


Taste Less Dept.

Not long ago I was a member of a mailing list that talked about avant-garde music, and one of the posts to the list made it into my clippings file. I stupidly deleted the original message, so I am not...


Not long ago I was a member of a mailing list that talked about avant-garde music, and one of the posts to the list made it into my clippings file. I stupidly deleted the original message, so I am not sure who is on either side of the conversation. But with an exchange like this it scarcely matters. (Original spelling and punctuation preserved.)


as i've said many times, there is no good music or bad music - just music you like or music you don't like

that opinion is banal, false and mistaken at the same time.

you are probably right that 'good' and 'bad' won't take you very far critically. to that extent it seems a banal observation.

then you conclude that there is 'just music you like or music you don't like', which seems patently false. there is just as obviously music that is more or less complex, music that has strict tempo and music that doesn't, tonal and atonal music, etc., etc., and many more critical categories that can be applied that tell you alot about music.

finally, i think it is mistaken, in the sense of being an opinion that should be opposed. it sounds liberal but it is arrogant: it pretends to be democratic (admitting that everyone has their own opinion), but it is self-serving because it implies that no one can criticise *your* taste.

i am not trolling - i just don't think that such banalities should pass without comment

This could apply to a critical appraisal of just about anything, when you get down to it. As it stands, it's one of the better arguments I've heard for being willing to examine and refine your own tastes without falling back on know-nothing arguments like "I don't know what 'good' art/literature/music is, but I know what I like."

Plenty of people use this formula to justify what they like. I know I used to do it, but after a while I realized something: If you don't do any actual thinking about what you like and don't like, if you shun trying to make deeper connections, in a way you're damaging your future ability to determine what you're going to like and not like. The problem with saying "I don't know what's 'good', but I know what I like" is that it's an argument in favor of your own continued ignorance about your tastes. And that means, as I see it, enduring a lot more crap than you have to.

Most folks aren't critics and don't want to become critics. For them, it's completely beside the point. They don't want to analyze what they like, they want to enjoy it — and the analysis, for them, ruins the enjoyment by turning the whole thing into a boring homework exercise. They're not worried that their justification is a circular argument — I like what I know, and I know what I like — because none of this requires logic to work.

The flipside of this, though, is that if they're in the company of people who analyze what they like as a way to deepen their enjoyment of it and find perspectives on it that they might not have found on their own, it isn't a homework assignment; it's fun.


Tags: criticism dharma


Black Magic

There’s no question in my mind that Dark Horse is doing the right thing by remastering and reissuing their back catalog of Masamune Shirow titles: Orion, Dominion, Ghost in the Shell. There’s also no question in my mind that Shirow’s...


Note: This article was originally written for Advanced Media Network. Its editorial style differs from reviews for this site.


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There’s no question in my mind that Dark Horse is doing the right thing by remastering and reissuing their back catalog of Masamune Shirow titles: Orion, Dominion, Ghost in the Shell. There’s also no question in my mind that Shirow’s books are a wildly uneven lot, and that’s why Dark Horse’s recent reissue of Shirow’s Black Magic is only of value to those who want every single one of his titles in a row on their shelf.

Magic is probably the earliest of Shirow’s works to be released in English, and its primordiality shows in every respect — artwork, storytelling, conceptualization, humor, the whole tamale. If nothing else it’s interesting because it shows how even in his earliest stages as a creator, Shirow suffered from the same limitations that also inhibited his later and more polished works. He spun out nigh-incomprehensible plots that seemed to be used more for atmosphere than actual storytelling; he created characters who were little more than mouthpieces of one variety or another; and he never met a whacked-out theory he didn’t like.


Tags: manga Masamune Shirow


DTRT Dept.

The July 2008 edition of Dean Sluyter's Questions column provides two answers to the old standby "How can I get enlightened?" The first answer has one graf I particularly liked: The Eightfold Path is not a program of accumulating merit...


The July 2008 edition of Dean Sluyter's Questions column provides two answers to the old standby "How can I get enlightened?" The first answer has one graf I particularly liked:

The Eightfold Path is not a program of accumulating merit (or merit badges) so that someday the Big Buddha in the Sky will open the gates of nirvana to you. Yes, some of the old texts can make it sound that way, but today sophisticated Buddhists generally give that language a more inward and immediate application. ... [I]t's pretty hard for most people to get their minds quiet and clear enough to recognize [that nirvana is right here in the ordinary world of samsara] if they're busy killing or stealing or coveting their neighbors' wives. Virtue is its own reward. ... [I]t helps release your consciousness from complicated patterns of aggression and consequences so that it's free to recognize its own inherent heavenliness. [Emphasis mine.]

We've all heard that one before: "virtue is its own reward." So much so, I suspect, that it's been drained of meaning and has no more real weight than a PSA about seatbelts. But reading that article helped click it into place, and allowed me to put into words a good deal of what has been floating around in my head on the subject for ages.

Most of us are probably familiar with the gamut of arguments about altruism — whether or not there is such a thing as a truly selfless act, etc. My take is that there probably isn't, but it doesn't matter — that there is a threshold of selflessness for a given act that once crossed makes it effectively selfless as far as others are concerned. A friend of mine once put it this way: "Yes, it is selfish of me to do good things for other people, because I enjoy watching them smile and be happy. That is very selfish of me!"

The more you do the right thing, the easier it becomes to cross that threshold without making yourself feel uncomfortable, because over time you lean more towards your desires and everyone else's being in sync. There will always be some level of conflict between what you want and what everyone else wants. You can't get rid of them entirely, but you can lean towards harmonizing them as much as possible. Even if that form of harmony consists of avoiding something entirely, it's better than inspiring further conflict with it.

The other part of how virtue winds up being its own reward is hinted at in the above excerpt. By doing the right thing, you're forced less and less to extricate yourself from the aftermath of having done the wrong thing. I'm reminded of people I used to know who would dream up huge, elaborate and quite physically and mentally tiring plans to defraud other people so they wouldn't have to work a straight job — and yet somehow never realized that it would probably be less work overall just to get and hold down a straight job. (Although, obviously, a lot less exciting — but again, their idea of "exciting" just sounds like unending hassle to me.)

This has implications on both the outside and the inside. When you're not making trouble for yourself outwardly, it's easier to learn how to not make trouble for yourself inwardly. I'm again reminded of people I knew who would encounter something negative in their daily lives, and then compulsively reinforce the badness by venting about it with others: "Look! This bad thing happened! Doesn't it suck? Don't you feel bad for me? Come on, let's commiserate about this terrible thing. — No! I don't want to hear about the fact that you had fun today. Nobody else deserves to have fun when I'm suffering like this." It's hard for me to see this serving any other function than to convince yourself that you're going to be miserable no matter what.

Virtue is its own reward because it makes the inside of your head a much more livable place. And at the end of the day, when your eyes are closed and your head's hitting the pillow, where else is there left to go?


Tags: dharma links


On Wings At Last Dept.

Thomas M. Disch is dead. The author of _Camp Concentration_, _On Wings of Song_ and, yes, _The Brave Little Toaster_ committed suicide at the age of 68 after life dealt him a few too many blows: an apartment fire, deaths...


Thomas M. Disch is dead. The author of _Camp Concentration_, _On Wings of Song_ and, yes, _The Brave Little Toaster_ committed suicide at the age of 68 after life dealt him a few too many blows: an apartment fire, deaths in the family, illness, you name it. Go read his books if you haven't already — he sits comfortably on the shelf next to Phil Dick, and was probably that much more accessible as well.

Tags: links writing


Metropolitan Dept.

Hell just froze over _again_. bq. Film archivists at the Museo del Cine (Cinema Museum) in Buenos Aires have recently uncovered the lost footage from Fritz Lang's original 1927 version of Metropolis in 16mm negatives! ... Apparently a copy of...


Hell just froze over _again_. bq. Film archivists at the Museo del Cine (Cinema Museum) in Buenos Aires have recently uncovered the lost footage from Fritz Lang's original 1927 version of Metropolis in 16mm negatives! ... Apparently a copy of the long version of the film was set to Argentina in 1928 for a theatre screening. Shortly thereafter, a local film critic came into possession of the film reels and added them to his private collection. They were later sold to Argentina's National Art Fund, and were eventually donated to the Museo del Cine, where they were eventually rediscovered by the museum's curator this past January. [from _The Digital Bits_] Kino had plans for a Blu-ray edition of the film in 2009, but it looks like they're going to have to _significantly_ revise that. This definitely goes into the permanent collection.

Tags: Blu-ray Disc hell freezes over movies


Jack. Black Jack. -- Dept.

Gloryowsky and praise be! "Vertical, Inc.":http://www.vertical-inc.com's site now has a web page for their edition of Osamu Tezuka's "Black Jack":http://vertical-inc.com/blackjack/index.html. Be sure to check out the free preview as well, which is drawn from a story that has never been...


Gloryowsky and praise be! "Vertical, Inc.":http://www.vertical-inc.com's site now has a web page for their edition of Osamu Tezuka's "Black Jack":http://vertical-inc.com/blackjack/index.html. Be sure to check out the free preview as well, which is drawn from a story that has never been in English before.

Tags: manga Osamu Tezuka Vertical Inc.



About this Archive

This page is an archive of entries in the Uncategorized / General category from July 2008.

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